Bad Movie Logo
"A website to the detriment of good film"
Custom Search
HOMEB-MOVIE REVIEWSREADER REVIEWSFORUMINTERVIEWSUPDATESABOUT
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 16, 2018, 05:43:29 PM
610009 Posts in 47097 Topics by 6271 Members
Latest Member: InaMerlo
Badmovies.org Forum  |  Movies  |  Bad Movies  |  Experiences in a theater. « previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] 3
Author Topic: Experiences in a theater.  (Read 1454 times)
Trevor
Doctor of Zombology
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 1416
Posts: 15829


South African Film Activist and Chief Troublemaker


WWW
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2018, 04:42:54 AM »

I once ate about half a packet of cola flavoured sweets in the cinema. I thought they tasted weird so I stopped eating them. when I got out into the foyer afterwards I realised each individual one was wrapped and I'd been eating them with the wrapping still on.

 BounceGiggle BounceGiggle
Logged
Trevor
Doctor of Zombology
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 1416
Posts: 15829


South African Film Activist and Chief Troublemaker


WWW
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2018, 04:52:33 AM »

When I saw The Silence of The Lambs in the theatre, the management of the theatre turned off all the lights in the place - even the exit lights - during the scene where Jodie Foster and Ted Levine are hunting each other in the dark. A few seconds of almost total dark - no light being thrown back from the screen - and someone stuck his cigarette lighter on, saying "I'm just giving Jodie Foster some light."  TeddyR TeddyR

Theatre watch on my own: watching Reservoir Dogs at a student run cinema in Mom's home town.  Thumbup

My first experience and the film which sent me on to infamy and ill-fortune: I was seven and watching Murder On the Orient Express - marked me for life.

Audience participation: I saw Die Hard in the theatre and the audience screamed at various parts of the film telling Bruce Willis to watch his ass, especially when the late Alan Rickman (RIP) fell out of the window. To see that scene on a curved screen is quite something.
Logged
RCMerchant
Bela
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 0
Posts: 16136


"Charlie,we're in HELL!"-"yeah,ain't it groovy?!"


WWW
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2018, 05:33:40 AM »

.I sat on a hill outside of Mastic-Shirley, LI with my brother Glenn and watched RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD- watched it at a drive-in with no sound. The next day we went to a grindhouse on William Flyod Highway and watched  it with sound with a bottle of whiskey and a joint we had snuck into the theater at a matinee- There were about 10 people there. It was great.
Logged

"Supernatural?...perhaps. Baloney?...Perhaps not!\" Bela Lugosi-the BLACK CAT (1934)

Slobber Drool Drip-
Now serving over 14,000 followers!

http://ronaldcmerchant.tumblr.com/

Interviewer-"Does Dracula ever end for you?"
Lugosi-"No. Dracula-never ends."
Svengoolie 3
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 102
Posts: 2354



« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2018, 04:53:06 PM »

When I saw The Silence of The Lambs in the theatre, the management of the theatre turned off all the lights in the place - even the exit lights - during the scene where Jodie Foster and Ted Levine are hunting each other in the dark. A few seconds of almost total dark - no light being thrown back from the screen - and someone stuck his cigarette lighter on, saying "I'm just giving Jodie Foster some light."  TeddyR TeddyR

Theatre watch on my own: watching Reservoir Dogs at a student run cinema in Mom's home town.  Thumbup

My first experience and the film which sent me on to infamy and ill-fortune: I was seven and watching Murder On the Orient Express - marked me for life.

Audience participation: I saw Die Hard in the theatre and the audience screamed at various parts of the film telling Bruce Willis to watch his ass, especially when the late Alan Rickman (RIP) fell out of the window. To see that scene on a curved screen is quite something.

Trev,  if you liked the original MotOE you should try the. A&E remake with David. Suchet.  It was quite good.
Logged

Hydra Dominatus!
BoyScoutKevin
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 239
Posts: 4491


« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2018, 04:58:42 PM »

Ye-es!

In 1979 at a showing of Zulu Dawn at a film theater in downtown Portland (Oregon.) Something of a prequel to 1964's Zulu and the battle of Rorke's Drift, as Zulu Dawn dealt with the previous battle of Isandlwana or one of the greatest defeats a British army has ever suffered at the hands of an army of natives.

Because I wanted to see it so bad, because of the cast, which we'll try to get to later, and because of my interest in the Zulu Wars, I took the bus from the town where I was living to Portland (Oregon.)

And whether it was the film or the location of the theater, there was only myself and a few other Caucasians in the audience, which was made up mostly of Native Americans.

And this is not to give into a stereotype, but there is something I can only call an Indian War Whoop, which I can not recreate, but which I certainly heard it enough that day. Indeed, every time one of the white actors died in the film, the Native Americans in the audience would let out with a loud war whoop. It is funny now. Not so funny then, as every time I thought a white actor was about to bite the dust, I look around the theater at the other audience members waiting for them to sound off again.

Good times, that now.
Logged
kornula
Dedicated Viewer
**

Karma: 4
Posts: 24


« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2018, 07:36:41 PM »

I saw LEAVING LAS VEGAS at the $1.00 theater waaaay back in the 20th century.   There was a group of about 10 or so who rode our bikes and met up there.   Throughout the movie, we were rather quiet.   As the lights came up and the credits started, one of us yelled out: "Lets get a drink!"

We did go to the liquor store right after...

Good times.

Another incident happened to my mother when she saw THE EXORSIST at the Grand Lake Theater in Oakland, California (1973..right?)   This is an old Movie palace that is still operating.  It's a huge ass screen and auditorium that seats 500.    When my mother and her friend went, there was less than 50 people in the theater.  Apparently the other group was predominantly from a Holy Roller baptist church because every one of them stood up and yelled "GET THAT DEVIL OUT!"

When she told me this story, I was sad that she did not take me to see it ...mind you I was 8 at the time.
Logged
RCMerchant
Bela
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 0
Posts: 16136


"Charlie,we're in HELL!"-"yeah,ain't it groovy?!"


WWW
« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2018, 10:54:09 PM »

Watching WILLARD (1970) at the Strand in Paw Paw up in the balcony with my brother Mike. I was 8- he was 10. It was the first movie I saw without my parents at a theater. We were throwing popcorn down at the kids  down below. It was a Matinee- on a Saturday afternoon.
Logged

"Supernatural?...perhaps. Baloney?...Perhaps not!\" Bela Lugosi-the BLACK CAT (1934)

Slobber Drool Drip-
Now serving over 14,000 followers!

http://ronaldcmerchant.tumblr.com/

Interviewer-"Does Dracula ever end for you?"
Lugosi-"No. Dracula-never ends."
Archivist
Bad Movie Lover
***

Karma: 69
Posts: 961


« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2018, 11:37:25 PM »

I was watching the martial arts pseudo biopic Ip Man 2 (2010) in a cinema almost entirely filled with Chinese people. There were maybe three or four Australian Caucasians in the whole theatre. The final fight is between the legendary Wing Chun master Ip Man and a fictional British boxer named Twister, who had previously killed another master and Ip Man's friend in the ring, so the tension was high.

Twister is huge and brutal, played by the late Darren Shahlavi. He pounds Ip Man, who gets knocked down and told that he can't kick or he will be disqualified. This is where the craziness started. When Ip Man began to win, the whole cinema began yelling with glee. When Ip Man struck Twister successfully, the audience erupted with applause. Guys, it's a freaking movie, it's not real! WTF! I kept my head still and glanced side to side, watching peoples' eyes bolted to the screen. It was like they were watching a real boxing match and cheering and clapping, but with a odd nationalistic fervour.

This is the final fight from Ip Man 2. Watch it with my theatre experience in mind. You'll understand how surreal and weirdly unsettling it was. I get it when a movie gets a standing ovation, or at the end of Ghostbusters (1984) when the audience clapped in time with the ending theme music, but this was on another level.

! No longer available Small | Large
Logged

"Many others since have tried & failed at making a watchable parasite slug movie" - LilCerberus
Trevor
Doctor of Zombology
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 1416
Posts: 15829


South African Film Activist and Chief Troublemaker


WWW
« Reply #23 on: September 13, 2018, 03:41:29 AM »

Ye-es!

In 1979 at a showing of Zulu Dawn at a film theater in downtown Portland (Oregon.) Something of a prequel to 1964's Zulu and the battle of Rorke's Drift, as Zulu Dawn dealt with the previous battle of Isandlwana or one of the greatest defeats a British army has ever suffered at the hands of an army of natives.

Because I wanted to see it so bad, because of the cast, which we'll try to get to later, and because of my interest in the Zulu Wars, I took the bus from the town where I was living to Portland (Oregon.)

And whether it was the film or the location of the theater, there was only myself and a few other Caucasians in the audience, which was made up mostly of Native Americans.

And this is not to give into a stereotype, but there is something I can only call an Indian War Whoop, which I can not recreate, but which I certainly heard it enough that day. Indeed, every time one of the white actors died in the film, the Native Americans in the audience would let out with a loud war whoop. It is funny now. Not so funny then, as every time I thought a white actor was about to bite the dust, I look around the theater at the other audience members waiting for them to sound off again.

Good times, that now.

That was a great South African movie with a very troubled production history.
Logged
Allhallowsday
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 1814
Posts: 14238


Either he's dead or my watch has stopped!


« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2018, 12:34:33 AM »

Watching WILLARD (1970) at the Strand in Paw Paw up in the balcony with my brother Mike. I was 8- he was 10. It was the first movie I saw without my parents at a theater. We were throwing popcorn down at the kids  down below. It was a Matinee- on a Saturday afternoon.
I saw WILLARD in the Spring Lake, NJ theater that same year it was new.  It must have been that summer... walking up to Peterson's for candy... the theater was right next door.  We also saw ESCAPE FROM THE PLANET OF THE APES in that theater!  Thank you Cousin CEE CEE. 
Logged

If you want to view paradise . . . simply look around and view it!
BoyScoutKevin
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 239
Posts: 4491


« Reply #25 on: September 19, 2018, 05:04:06 PM »

As I said, here is the cast for Zulu Dawn (1979) and while those of us who are not familiar with the British film industry, may not recognize most of the names, they should be familiar for those who are some what more familiar with that industry.

Burt Lancaster -- Simon Ward -- Denholm Elliott -- Peter Vaughan -- James Faulkner -- Christopher Cazenoe -- Bob Hoskins -- Peter O'Toole -- Nigel Davenport -- Michael Jayston -- Ronald Pickup -- Ronald Lacey -- Sir John Mills -- Freddie Jones -- Donald Pickering -- Nicholas Clay -- Graham Armitage -- and Ann Calder-Marshall.

And I am sorry to hear about its troubles. That may be why it got so little play in the U.S. Though, I do believe I have a video copy of it. Though, like so much of what I have/had, it's boxed up and in storage. I also know that the script was adapted and written up as a book by director Cy Endfield. That I also have and again it is boxed up and in storage.
Logged
316zombie
zombie chef to the stars
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 137
Posts: 1769



« Reply #26 on: September 22, 2018, 07:43:38 PM »

I forget what movie I was watching at the time but years ago I was in a theater when the film literally broke. Lights came up, the management asked us to please give them ten minutes or so to fix the problem. Ten or fifteen minutes later, the movie started up again, and a little while later - SNAP! It broke again. The management then gave up, apologized, and offered everyone a refund.

 i've got a version of your experience, only in multiples, lol! the movie is " the ghost and mr. chicken", and i went to the theater FIVE different times, in FIVE different theaters to see it.
   every single time, the danged film caught fire! and once was at a drivein theater too. i was around 5 or 6 at the time.
   later, in my early teens, i kept trying to catch it on TV, EVERY TIME the power would go out, that happened at least a dozen times over the course of 3 or 4 years. i FINALLY got to see the whole thing in the mid 80's( my mid 20's) on a rented vhs tape& machine.
  i swear to you, i held my breath through the whole movie, waiting for the power to go out, or the tape to break, or the machine to burst into flames, lol! STILL a favorite movie! Cheers
Logged

don't EVEN...EVER!
kornula
Dedicated Viewer
**

Karma: 4
Posts: 24


« Reply #27 on: September 26, 2018, 02:07:04 AM »

Our family went to see The Muppet Movie at our home town theater (waaaay back in ...79?  80?)   The Sebastiani Theater was notorious for having the film break - not always, but enough to be prepared for it just in case.  Well there was the scene when the film strip melts and goes white.   Everyone in the theater thought it was happening for real.  We all started to get up and walk out.. when we heard the Swedish Chef bork borking.

BTW; the film did not ironically break once.
Logged
Svengoolie 3
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 102
Posts: 2354



« Reply #28 on: September 27, 2018, 12:40:53 AM »

Our family went to see The Muppet Movie at our home town theater (waaaay back in ...79?  80?)   The Sebastiani Theater was notorious for having the film break - not always, but enough to be prepared for it just in case.  Well there was the scene when the film strip melts and goes white.   Everyone in the theater thought it was happening for real.  We all started to get up and walk out.. when we heard the Swedish Chef bork borking.

BTW; the film did not ironically break once.

Did it break in an unironic fashion? Wink
Logged

Hydra Dominatus!
Dark Alex
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 449
Posts: 3291



« Reply #29 on: September 27, 2018, 02:33:17 AM »

When we were kids I went to see Ghostbusters with my older brother in one of the local cinema's (The Regal).

All well and good there.

I then went to see it again with my friend Mark. Knowing full well what was going to happen when the Ghostbusters were sneaking up on the ghost in the library I yelled "RAAAAAAAGGGGGGHHHHH!!!" in Mark's ear at the point where she turned round to frighten them. He jumped out of his seat letting out the second most girly scream I have ever heard in my life.

Mark clearly did not learn his lesson about going to the cinema with me as I was able to repeat this when we went to see Jaws 4 together.
Logged

There is a secret song at the center of the world, Joey, and its sound is like razors through flesh.
Pages: 1 [2] 3
Badmovies.org Forum  |  Movies  |  Bad Movies  |  Experiences in a theater. « previous next »
    Jump to:  


    RSS Feed Subscribe Subscribe by RSS
    Email Subscribe Subscribe by Email


    Popular Articles
    How To Find A Bad Movie

    The Champions of Justice

    Plan 9 from Outer Space

    Manos, The Hands of Fate

    Podcast: Todd the Convenience Store Clerk

    Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!

    Dragonball: The Magic Begins

    Cool As Ice

    The Educational Archives: Driver's Ed

    Godzilla vs. Monster Zero

    Do you have a zombie plan?

    FROM THE BADMOVIES.ORG ARCHIVES
    ImageThe Giant Claw - Slime drop

    Earth is visited by a GIANT ANTIMATTER SPACE BUZZARD! Gawk at the amazingly bad bird puppet, or chuckle over the silly dialog. This is one of the greatest b-movies ever made.

    Lesson Learned:
    • Osmosis: os·mo·sis (oz-mo'sis, os-) n., 1. When a bird eats something.

    Subscribe to Badmovies.org and get updates by email:

    HOME B-Movie Reviews Reader Reviews Forum Interviews TV Shows Advertising Information Sideshows Links Contact

    Badmovies.org is owned and operated by Andrew Borntreger. All original content is © 1998 - 2014 by its respective author(s). Image, video, and audio files are used in accordance with the Fair Use Law, and are property of the film copyright holders. You may freely link to any page (.html or .php) on this website, but reproduction in any other form must be authorized by the copyright holder.