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Other Topics => Entertainment => Topic started by: A.J. Bauer on October 11, 2017, 09:19:45 PM



Title: Stephen King's IT (The Novel)
Post by: A.J. Bauer on October 11, 2017, 09:19:45 PM
I haven't seen the new IT but honestly, I don't really want to.
Yeah, I got a really funny signature pic out of it but despite it's overwhelmingly positive reception
I have strong misgivings about the film. For one thing I don't much care for jumpscares. (I don't hate them as much as others though)
But Bill Skarsgard's interpretation of Pennywise The Dancing Clown just looks... Well. I refer you to my signature.
I don't want to watch the miniseries with Tim Curry either. I know how dumb the ending is.

No, instead I decided to read the novel. But by "read" I really mean "listen to". I got my hands on the audiobook.
Truth is, I never liked novels. As a kid the only novels I liked were Harry Potter and Eragon. Every other novel bored me to tears.
Probably because while the writing in those novels were simplistic they cut the bulls**t. I know people will think I'm some sort of classless neanderthal
but I seriously do not care about how the air felt again the character's skin or any kind of fluff like that.
The audiobook is no exception to this issue but at least I can do other things while I wait for the boring s**t to end.

I'm not that far into it but I'll give my opinion on it as I go along (Expect spoilers). So far despite the stupid fluff I'm really enjoying it.
The guy reading the book (Steven Weber) has a great variety of voices and his interpretation of stereotypical Jewish characters like Stanley just kills me.

So far in the book there have been three deaths. Georgie and a gay man named Adrian Melon (Who was a victim of a hate crime) were both killed by Pennywise. Stanley ended his own life in the bathtub. The last scene I saw had a woman named Beverly leaving her abusive husband, although not before beating the s**t out of him with the same belt he hit her with. Not gonna lie. Bad things happening to abusive husbands is pretty satisfying.

Anywho, the audiobook is 48-hours long so it'll be a while before I get to the end. Hopefully there's no giant spider in this one.


Title: Re: Stephen King's IT (The Novel)
Post by: indianasmith on October 11, 2017, 09:30:54 PM
I haven't read the book in a very long time, but I really enjoyed it when it came out and read it several times.
King's strongest point as a writer is how believable and sympathetic his characters are, and he is often at his best with child characters.
I am old enough that I could identify with those late fifties kids in the story, they could have been my older siblings.
The child actors MADE this movie for me.  Perfectly cast and brilliantly acted.

Keep us posted as to your impressions; you are making me want to read the book again.


Title: Re: Stephen King's IT (The Novel)
Post by: A.J. Bauer on October 15, 2017, 05:27:18 PM
Henry Bowers is amazingly crazy. I love it.

In the last scene Pennywise had another appearance. This time he was on the frozen lake offering a balloon to Benjamin who ran away in terror.

At least he's smarter than Georgie.


Title: Re: Stephen King's IT (The Novel)
Post by: Chainsaw midget on October 16, 2017, 07:56:54 PM
I remember loving the book, but I haven't read it since I was in highschool. 


Title: Re: Stephen King's IT (The Novel)
Post by: RCMerchant on November 10, 2017, 06:52:52 PM
The book is fantastic! The town Derry is used in lotsa his other books too. It's like a mythology.
 They even reference the flood in some of his other books. I think it's one of his best.


Title: Re: Stephen King's IT (The Novel)
Post by: Trevor on November 14, 2017, 03:59:25 AM
I remember crying when I read the second last page of that book: the way Mr King describes what lies ahead for the kids, tells them he loves them and then bids them farewell with "Be true, be brave, stand."  :bluesad:


Title: Re: Stephen King's IT (The Novel)
Post by: Allhallowsday on November 14, 2017, 11:32:19 AM
STEPHEN KING himself said he suffered from "literary elephantiasis" and this book is the perfect example of that.  I do think, however, that the first chapter might be the best piece of writing he's done...