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October 22, 2014, 04:55:19 PM
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Andrew
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« Reply #15 on: May 14, 2007, 12:07:40 PM »

I notice the bush tomato variety is perfect for limited space gardens much like the one I have.  They don't get too high and are great producers.  Anyone else ever try them? 

Did some more planting ourselves, though all of ours must be in (as said, rental home) pots.

I have tried some of the bush variety tomato plants before, but we did not enjoy them as much as other red tomatoes.  They seem to lack flavor (all of the ones we tried).  I do have two Yellow Pear tomato plants that are going nuts.  They are so large and full (probably 28" tall already, and bushy) that I am going to stop pinching off the blooms and let them fruit.

My Black Prince plants appear to be bouncing back after their shock from being transplanted (they were started inside from seed).

For flavor, I have always liked some of the classics like Brandywines and Rutgers (I have three Brandywine plants).  Grape tomatoes are another favorite, especially for Jenna.  She eats grape tomatoes right off the vine.  I am trying out a variety called Pineapple that we started from seed.  Also, I am hoping my Tigerella's get over their transplant shock.

We have two Jet Star Hybrids, a type I have never tried before, that are growing well.  The proof will be if the fruit is a good flavor.  I did not plant any this year, but we have done Better Boy (another hybrid, I think) and those tasted good.

Both of my long planters full of beans are looking great.  I need to trellis them soon - going to make jute lines for them to run up the side of the deck.  The cucumbers are starting to break the ground too.  The early planter of zuchini we planted is already putting out the secondary (mature) leaves that are about 4" across.  My California Wonder peppers are getting over their transplant shock (those are great peppers).
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« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2007, 01:18:14 PM »

Andrew, I'm jealous!  My plants haven't fared well this year.  The Easter freeze combined with bad soil and squirrels has ruined what I was trying to do in my front courtyard, and I don't know what to do to fix it.  The herbs I have in pots are doing so well that they all need bigger containers though, so at least something is growing.
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« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2007, 07:00:06 PM »

Tomoatos I've done the beefseak celebrity and sweet cherry 100.  It seems every year I come across a different hybrid that I hadn't seen the year before. 

Beans are great producers.  I usually end up giving them away towards the end of their run because I get "beaned" out. 
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« Reply #18 on: May 15, 2007, 02:20:29 PM »

I grow those little red chili peppers.  I've been using the seeds from the previous year's crop for about 8 years now.  The first two years here in Toledo (2004 & 05) I got bumper crops but the last couple of years nothing.  The plants never even matured.  I start them off inside, in big pots (where they've always stayed I had been living in apartments) with a good grow light.  This year I made an indoor greenhouse for them in the basement, and they've just recently come up.
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« Reply #19 on: May 16, 2007, 11:07:43 AM »

I grow those little red chili peppers.  I've been using the seeds from the previous year's crop for about 8 years now.  The first two years here in Toledo (2004 & 05) I got bumper crops but the last couple of years nothing.  The plants never even matured.  I start them off inside, in big pots (where they've always stayed I had been living in apartments) with a good grow light.  This year I made an indoor greenhouse for them in the basement, and they've just recently come up.

Could they be a hybrid variety that is not viable after a generation or two?  I know that some are that way, but will usually not sprout at all from what I have seen.  Also, always be careful of overwatering plants.  A lot of times when I give other gardeners help, it turns out that they water too much.

You probably know all this anyway.  Maybe the weather has just been poor for that sort of plant?
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Andrew Borntreger
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« Reply #20 on: May 16, 2007, 11:15:59 AM »

I've noticed peppers are delicate in the colder weather.  Thats why I'm sitting on the edge of my seat whenever I notice a drop in the temperature lately.  I usally buy the plants already started.  Luckily I have several garden shops in 5 minute traveling area that sell seedlings 6 for below $3.00.  Beans and peas I usually do from seed.  How much do you folks play for you plants?

Anyone ever do corn?  Any tips would be appreciated. 
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« Reply #21 on: May 16, 2007, 11:39:23 AM »

Around here most plants are $2 - $3, depending on maturity.

I have had mixed results with corn.  It seems to like a lot of water, but you also have to give it some shelter from the wind.  You know, Native Americans supposedly grew the "Three Sisters" in clumps.  At the center would be corn, then climbing beans around the base, and finally squash a little farther out.  Apparently, this helped to conserve water around the plants and provided the best bang for the buck.  Everything worked together.
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« Reply #22 on: May 16, 2007, 03:43:43 PM »


Could they be a hybrid variety that is not viable after a generation or two?  I know that some are that way, but will usually not sprout at all from what I have seen.  Also, always be careful of overwatering plants.  A lot of times when I give other gardeners help, it turns out that they water too much.

You probably know all this anyway.  Maybe the weather has just been poor for that sort of plant?

I got about 6-7 generations out of them, the last two were real good.  Of course now the seeds are about 2-3 years old.  Last year the plants were inside, with the grow light and they sprouted & pretty much died.  I'm trying not to overwater, thanks.

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« Reply #23 on: June 07, 2007, 11:20:32 AM »

I just finished up my big garden at the farm the other day.  I'm actually sharing it with my grandfather in law.  So far we've got;

two rows of onions
5 rows of corn
one row of hot portugual peppers
one row of summer squash
two rows of cucumbers
one row and a half of green beans
half a row of tomato plants
 
the rows are generally about 10 feet in length so I'm hoping for major production.  The strawberry fields at the farm are popping.  Hopefully they'll start picking this weekend.  The stuff behind myself is doing good although it has been cold the past few nights.  How is everyone else doing in your area?
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« Reply #24 on: June 07, 2007, 11:55:04 AM »

Wow, I wish I had that much room to play with.  Everything of mine is in pots, though I have a lot and big pots.

My two Yellow Pair tomato plants are heavy with fruit.  We'll probably start getting some mature ones off of those in about two or three weeks.  I've never tried this sort of small, sweet tomato before, but am looking forward to them.  The plants are huge, like 3' high!

I am a little disappointed in my two Jet Star Hybrid plants (another variety I had never tried before).  They got big and now seem to be having problems.  I don't think that they like hot weather and full sun.  I'm moving them to see what I can do.

The two Black Prince tomatoes are having issues, but we had a problem.  I caught Andy and Jenna watering them with bubble stuff.  We had a talk about that.

All of the other tomato plants seem to be doing pretty good, especially my Brandywine plants.  One of the Brandywine plants is almost the size of the Yellow Pears.

My zucchini are not doing too well for some reason.  I might have planted them too early.  The other pot with all yellow squash is great, as is the third pot with zucchini and butternut.  I'm thinking that we will have some yellow and zucchinis before the end of June.  Those fruit grow like crazy on hot days.

The beans and cucumbers are all growing well.  I have the beans trellised and they are going up fast.

We've already harvested much of the spinach and will take the rest this week.  Then I'll replant that long pot with spinach again.  Katie used the first batch of spinach in a really good pasta dish with italian bacon too.  I'm going to start cutting romaine lettuce this week for salads as well.



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Andrew Borntreger
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« Reply #25 on: June 10, 2007, 06:03:47 PM »

Odd thing happened today at the farm.  I was raking up the land a bit in between plants and my grandfather in law came over with some of the strawberry pickers.  He lets them plant a garden in or around the same area of land that I do.  These ladies know little English but believe me, they are expert farmers. 

Anyhow, my neighbor gave me some cucumber plants to put in over there a few weeks ago.  Or at least I thought they were cucumbers.  The lady took one look at them and stated saying "zucchini, zucchini".  Apparently I am going to have zucchini but its still up in the air.   So long story short, I have a mystery crop on my hands. 

Once things catch on a little more, I'll take some pics and post them in this thread. 
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« Reply #26 on: June 11, 2007, 12:48:58 PM »

If you're going to have zucchini, be prepared to have lots and lots of zucchini.
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« Reply #27 on: June 11, 2007, 02:30:47 PM »

I accidentally killed my cilantro.  I didn't know you're not supposed to transplant it, apparently that sends it into shock, it sends up flowers, then dies off to seeds.  Ooopsies!  Everything else I have in pots is doing well, especially the cherry tomatoes I planted, as they have lots of fruit starting already.  The plants I have in the ground have been through a late freeze, squirrel damage, and now a semi-drought, so I'm close to giving up on those.
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« Reply #28 on: June 11, 2007, 08:27:11 PM »

Our garden is kind of a mixed bag this year.  I got a ten pack of those onion sets, only four came up so I planted radishes in the extra space.  Then three more onions came up.  Oh well, I didn't plant a radish directly on top of any of them.  Kind of weird the way some took a full month longer than others to come up.  I've got a whole bunch of onions I planted from seeds as well.  They didn't come up in the back one-third of the garden so I replanted that area.  Got two rows of sweet peppers, but when they didn't come up I planted three hot pepper plants in that area.  Then of course the sweet peppers came up.  I guess they'll just have to fight it out amongst themselves.  The sweet peppers are only about an inch tall - if they're going to grow into bushes they better hurry the hell up.  The beans are only doing okay, about a quarter of them didn't come up so I replanted them and they just grew into these two inch tall stalks with no leaves.  Maybe I'll try replanting them yet again.  The other three-quarters of them are coming along pretty well, we got pole beans for the first time and they're climbing their poles.  The peas are doing great, I planted a whole pile of them and they've got 9 tomato cages to climb on.  Some of them are 2 feet tall already.  We've got two regular tomato plants and one grape tomato plant, all of those are doing just fine.  They're about three feet tall or so.  We've got a few small tomatoes but it will be at least a month before they get ripe. 
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« Reply #29 on: June 11, 2007, 09:39:24 PM »

our garden is about a acre I wide row plant so I can till and not hoe. We grow about everything you can grow in a garden. Then we spend most of summer and fall canning or freezing. We also do a kitchen garden and a herb garden.

For those of you over run with Zucchini's  and Sumer Squash try this ...

Slice about 1/4" to 1/2" thick dip in garlic oil salt pepper assorted spices if you want and grill both sides until done. It's great for those too big to do anything with Zucch's if you make bread with it you can also grate it and put it in freezer bag and safe it until fall or winter and have fresh zucchini bread then too. We also dehydrate a lot of stuff too.
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