Bad Movie Logo
"A website to the detriment of good film"
Custom Search
HOMEB-MOVIE REVIEWSREADER REVIEWSFORUMINTERVIEWSUPDATESABOUT
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
October 22, 2014, 05:08:14 PM
536103 Posts in 40555 Topics by 5098 Members
Latest Member: AqueousStar
Badmovies.org Forum  |  Other Topics  |  Entertainment  |  Who was your first musical love? « previous next »
Pages: 1 [2]
Author Topic: Who was your first musical love?  (Read 6482 times)
Jack
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 1047
Posts: 9562



« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2008, 09:02:03 AM »

My first musical love was Diana Ross and the Supremes.  My folks had an 8 track of them and I'd listen to it over and over.  Also The Fifth Dimension (Up, Up and Away), and Nancy Sinatra.  The first 8 track I ever bought was Shawn Cassidy.  Never thought I'd admit that in public.  After that, it was the Bee Gees (hey, I still like disco and those guys were awesome), and for some reason I picked up Van Halen II, which heralded my descent into the dark side.
Logged

"Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect." - Mark Twain
Ash
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 0
Posts: 6612


14 Year Badmovies.org Veteran


« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2008, 09:10:02 AM »

I'd have to say for me it would be a toss up between old Judas Priest and Autograph.
My cousin let me borrow his British Steel album when I was like 9 years old and I remember loving it.


Then in 1984, Autograph released their album Sign In Please and I went over to the glam side of metal.

This song still kicks ass today!
Small | Large


In 1984 I was 10 years old and I remember begging my grandpa to take me to an autograph signing the band Autograph was having at a local record shop.
I can still rember what I wore that day.
Black & red parachute pants and a weird matching black & red michael jackson looking top.
I looked like someone staight from the movie "Breakin'".  
Oh...and my hair was spiked.   Wink

It was funny to see my grandpa standing among all those glam metalheads with long hair.
Anyway, I got all the band member's autographs by having them sign the inside of my Sign In Please cassette tape liner.
Most of those liners contained lyrics and credits, but Autograph's liner was completely blank.
I still have the tape and autographs.   Thumbup
And just like in the video, drummer Keni Richards signed mine with a big ugly X.

Years later around 1988 or '89, a friend of mine loaned me his Anthrax (State of Euphoria) and Metallica (And Justice For All) tapes and I was hooked on hard metal.
Still am today.   Smile
« Last Edit: January 29, 2008, 09:14:05 AM by Ash » Logged
RapscallionJones
B-Movie Site Webmaster
Bad Movie Lover
****

Karma: 43
Posts: 380


Grim & Frostbitten


WWW
« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2008, 12:56:59 PM »

I was, like, 12, I think when I first started really listening to music as a fan.  For me, it's a toss up between two albums from wildly divergent styles.

Guns 'n' Roses - Apetite For Destruction
One of the most confrontational albums I've ever heard in my entire life.  I'd been listening to a lot of silly metal at the time, whatever was getting rotation on rock stations, like Motley Crue and s**t, but this was the first time my eyes were opened.  I couldn't particularly relate to it at all because I was a 12 year shooting hoops in my driveway with this blasting and not some Sunset Strip degenerate.  I had no idea what Night Train was and the references of Mr. Brownstone flew right over my head.  My Michelle also sounded like a frightening girl that I never wanted to meet.  The power of the album was unmistakable, though.  It makes Los Angeles sound like ground zero for the Apocalypse.  A total free for all.  While most of the bands from that area were writing 10 songs about barely concealed sexual innuendo plus a cheesy power ballad for the top 40, Guns 'n' Roses didn't really seem to give a s**t.  Sweet Child O' Mine may carry that power ballad weight, but it still rocks too hard and would probably eat Every Rose Has Its Thorn for breakfast.  I even feel like this album is relevant today.  It's extremely dark and the feeling that I was listening to something very dangerous gripped me for years.  The Use Your Illusions were a decent follow up, but they betrayed every rule set by Apetite in terms of four on the floor rock and roll and dipped into the sort of excesses that the band may not have had time to think about between recording, playing out and coke binges.  I still listen to this album with the same ears that I did when I was 12 and it's still as awesome.  Following my initial exposure, I was sucked in and became a huge GnR fan.  Somewhere at home I still have a junior sized denim jacket with a big-ass back patch with the album's cover on it.

The other album that changed my life was:

NWA - Straight Outta Compton
I liked hip hop a lot way back before it had heavy rotation on every radio station.  It's tough to imagine a time when the stuff wasn't everywhere you looked and a major pop-cultural force but it was true.  The stuff that did get circulation in mostly white communities was about as safe and comfortable as it gets but this album, released around the same time as Apetite and set in the same city, had the same kind of confrontational message that depicted a place that was frightening.  I'll admit that the album drew me in originally because the word f**k is exclaimed somewhere in the hundreds of times, but the lyrics were real storytelling.  It's a cartoony picture of South Central LA where everyone carries an assault rifle for protection, but again, I was just some brat in the burbs on the edge of mountain country so what was I to know?  The beats are so hard and as far as I was concerned, this was just another form of heavy metal.  A form of music so extreme that most people turned away from it because it scared them.  NWA followed it up with some real mediocrity, but when your debut is so absolutely strong, it's impossible to match the power.  Dre and Ice Cube have both released some solid hip hop in the years to follow but nothing any of them have ever done ever matched the balls and machismo of this album.  Since then, I've always had a love of hip-hop.  I don't talk about it much because I'm either listening to obscure indie hip-hop, weird, way out arty hip-hop or I'm too ashamed to admit that I like Timbaland's beats publicly.
Logged

Visit the b-movie blog
http://www.cinema-suicide.com
The required Myspace profile
http://www.myspace.com/cinemasuicide
Allhallowsday
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 1544
Posts: 10845


Either he's dead or my watch has stopped!


« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2008, 02:01:42 PM »

Guns 'n' Roses - Apetite For Destruction
One of the most confrontational albums I've ever heard in my entire life.  I couldn't particularly relate to it at all because I was a 12 year shooting hoops in my driveway with this blasting and not some Sunset Strip degenerate.  ...The power of the album was unmistakable...  It makes Los Angeles sound like ground zero for the Apocalypse ...Sweet Child O' Mine may carry that power ballad weight, but it ...would probably eat Every Rose Has Its Thorn for breakfast.  ...the feeling that I was listening to something very dangerous gripped me for years...   
NWA - Straight Outta Compton ~I liked hip hop a lot way back before it had heavy rotation on every radio station.  It's tough to imagine a time when the stuff wasn't everywhere you looked and a major pop-cultural force but it was true.  ...It's a cartoony picture of South Central LA where everyone carries an assault rifle for protection, The beats are so hard and as far as I was concerned, this was just another form of heavy metal... a form of music so extreme that most people turned away from it because it scared them...
Hey RapscallionJones, beautifully written commentary, I edited the quotation of your post mainly for space, but also to highlight some of your cool comments.  You have wonderful personal insight.  They are two great and hugely important albums, I know I'll be listening to Appetite later...  Thumbup
Logged

If you want to view paradise . . . simply look around and view it!
Ash
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 0
Posts: 6612


14 Year Badmovies.org Veteran


« Reply #19 on: January 30, 2008, 04:45:40 AM »

I totally agree about Straight Outta Compton.
Awesome album!   Thumbup
I have both the CD and all the songs on it uploaded to my MP3 player and still listen to it often.
Memories of my friends & I cruising around blasting "Dopeman" and the title track, "Straight Outta Compton" are still fresh.

But the album that really got me into hip-hop was Eazy Duz It by Eazy-E.


It had a huge impact on me when I was 16 years old back in 1990.
"Nobody Move" and "Boyz-N-The-Hood" still bring back strong memories of my adolescence whenever I hear them.
It was one of those tapes that I had to hide from my parents or else it would've been confiscated.

Another great gangsta rap group was The Geto Boys.

Their sound was as good as NWA.

In the music section of my Myspace page, I state that I like old school rap from the late 80's-early 90's and I stick by that statement.
Hip-hop nowadays is 99.999% crap compared to the hard hitting beats and lyrics rappers pushed out back then.

« Last Edit: January 30, 2008, 05:00:25 AM by Ash » Logged
HappyGilmore
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 583
Posts: 10383


I know Quack-Fu.


« Reply #20 on: January 30, 2008, 09:48:18 AM »

I totally agree about Straight Outta Compton.
Awesome album!   Thumbup
I have both the CD and all the songs on it uploaded to my MP3 player and still listen to it often.
Memories of my friends & I cruising around blasting "Dopeman" and the title track, "Straight Outta Compton" are still fresh.

But the album that really got me into hip-hop was Eazy Duz It by Eazy-E.


It had a huge impact on me when I was 16 years old back in 1990.
"Nobody Move" and "Boyz-N-The-Hood" still bring back strong memories of my adolescence whenever I hear them.
It was one of those tapes that I had to hide from my parents or else it would've been confiscated.

Another great gangsta rap group was The Geto Boys.

Their sound was as good as NWA.

In the music section of my Myspace page, I state that I like old school rap from the late 80's-early 90's and I stick by that statement.
Hip-hop nowadays is 99.999% crap compared to the hard hitting beats and lyrics rappers pushed out back then.



Check out Loose Cannons if you haven't heard of them.  They don't compare to NWA, but compared to the crap today, they're pretty damn good.
Logged

"The path to Heaven runs through miles of clouded Hell."

Donít get too close, itís dark inside.
Itís where my demons hide, itís where my demons hide.
RCMerchant
Bela
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 0
Posts: 10923


"Charlie,we're in HELL!"-"yeah,ain't it groovy?!"


WWW
« Reply #21 on: January 30, 2008, 01:05:47 PM »

I totally agree about Straight Outta Compton.
Awesome album!   Thumbup
I have both the CD and all the songs on it uploaded to my MP3 player and still listen to it often.
Memories of my friends & I cruising around blasting "Dopeman" and the title track, "Straight Outta Compton" are still fresh.

But the album that really got me into hip-hop was Eazy Duz It by Eazy-E.


It had a huge impact on me when I was 16 years old back in 1990.
"Nobody Move" and "Boyz-N-The-Hood" still bring back strong memories of my adolescence whenever I hear them.
It was one of those tapes that I had to hide from my parents or else it would've been confiscated.

Another great gangsta rap group was The Geto Boys.

Their sound was as good as NWA.

In the music section of my Myspace page, I state that I like old school rap from the late 80's-early 90's and I stick by that statement.
Hip-hop nowadays is 99.999% crap compared to the hard hitting beats and lyrics rappers pushed out back then.




I like very,VERY little hip hop/rap. BUT I do like NWA and EAZY E quite a bit!

Here you go ,ASH...TROLL 2 backed by EAZY E!!!! Remarkable video...really...!!!! It matches up as to be uncanny..!

   
Small | Large
Logged

\"Supernatural?...perhaps. Baloney?...Perhaps not!\" Bela Lugosi-the BLACK CAT (1934)


Interviewer-"Does Dracula ever end for you?"
Lugosi-"No. Dracula-never ends."





http://www.tumblr.com/dashboard
http://www.tumblr.com/dashboard
http://rcmerchant.tumblr.com/
JaseSF
Super Space Age Freaky Geek
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 638
Posts: 12860


Soon, your brain will turn to jelly.


« Reply #22 on: January 30, 2008, 07:50:07 PM »

Growing up, I liked a wide variety of music...ranging from classic hits to heavy metal to rap to techno dance for a brief time. None of it though really hit home with me personally until in the mid 1980s, I first heard "Orange Crush" by R.E.M.. I just had to hear more of the band and I loved nearly everything I heard come from them...only in the 90s when drummer Bill Berry left did they seem to lose some steam but they still delivered some good stuff now and then. I still own more music on cassette and CD by R.E.M. than any other band as much as I love bands like The Ramones, The Clash, The Sex Pistols, The Misfits, Blue Oyster Cult, Motorhead and others.
Logged

"This above all: To thine own self be true!"



R.I.P. Geoffrey William Stirling
Allhallowsday
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 1544
Posts: 10845


Either he's dead or my watch has stopped!


« Reply #23 on: January 30, 2008, 08:50:33 PM »

I'm with you guys, most Rap is kuh-Rap, but in the beginning, in the 80s early 90s there were some great records, NWA being the most shocking and edgy (and nearly the greatest).  I think It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back and Fear Of A Black Planet by PUBLIC ENEMY were important. 
I was into BIZ MARKIE enough to buy his CD The Diabolical Biz Markie The Biz Never Sleeps; of course, what I liked about it was its upfront crappiness.  He definitely made me chuckle. 
Small | Large
« Last Edit: February 03, 2008, 11:06:30 PM by Allhallowsday » Logged

If you want to view paradise . . . simply look around and view it!
Pages: 1 [2]
Badmovies.org Forum  |  Other Topics  |  Entertainment  |  Who was your first musical love? « previous next »
    Jump to:  


    RSS Feed Subscribe Subscribe by RSS
    Email Subscribe Subscribe by Email


    Popular Articles
    How To Find A Bad Movie

    The Champions of Justice

    Plan 9 from Outer Space

    Manos, The Hands of Fate

    Podcast: Todd the Convenience Store Clerk

    Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!

    Dragonball: The Magic Begins

    Cool As Ice

    The Educational Archives: Driver's Ed

    Godzilla vs. Monster Zero

    Do you have a zombie plan?

    FROM THE BADMOVIES.ORG ARCHIVES
    ImageThe Giant Claw - Slime drop

    Earth is visited by a GIANT ANTIMATTER SPACE BUZZARD! Gawk at the amazingly bad bird puppet, or chuckle over the silly dialog. This is one of the greatest b-movies ever made.

    Lesson Learned:
    • Osmosis: os∑mo∑sis (oz-mo'sis, os-) n., 1. When a bird eats something.

    Subscribe to Badmovies.org and get updates by email:

    HOME B-Movie Reviews Reader Reviews Forum Interviews TV Shows Advertising Information Sideshows Links Contact

    Badmovies.org is owned and operated by Andrew Borntreger. All original content is © 1998 - 2014 by its respective author(s). Image, video, and audio files are used in accordance with the Fair Use Law, and are property of the film copyright holders. You may freely link to any page (.html or .php) on this website, but reproduction in any other form must be authorized by the copyright holder.