Bad Movie Logo
"A website to the detriment of good film"
Custom Search
HOMEB-MOVIE REVIEWSREADER REVIEWSFORUMINTERVIEWSUPDATESABOUT
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
September 18, 2014, 01:01:56 AM
533665 Posts in 40373 Topics by 5061 Members
Latest Member: unclal
Badmovies.org Forum  |  Other Topics  |  Entertainment  |  Reading anything? « previous next »
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 98
Author Topic: Reading anything?  (Read 139395 times)
ER
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 281
Posts: 1667



« Reply #30 on: December 04, 2008, 12:43:02 PM »

lester, I hadn't heard of that institute, but thanks for the link. I'll check it out. Is that the same Rose Wilder Lane who was the daughter of Laura and Almanzo Wilder of Little House fame?

Today I'm re-reading The Waterworks, by E.L. Doctorow. He is a deft writer and that's probably my favorite among his books. Well, maybe...
« Last Edit: December 04, 2008, 12:44:39 PM by ER » Logged

Seeking Tir a 'nOg since 1978.
peter johnson
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 107
Posts: 1490



« Reply #31 on: December 04, 2008, 05:44:21 PM »

Mofo:  Dan Simmons lives up the road a piece from me in Longmont, Colorado.  I've never gone up and knocked on his door, nor bothered him in our local pubs, so can't claim personal contact.  Hoping to meet him as part of our local theatre audiences.  Many of his contemporary bits are set in towns very much like Longmont.

I recently finished reading "The Graveyard Book" by Neil Gaiman.  My wife went to hear him read from it, but I was rehearsing that night & couldn't go.  She did get me an autographed copy.

Very good young adult book -- sort of on a Harry Potter level.  Not much really gross, apart from when the protagonist meets up with some ghouls, and no sex to speak of.  Mostly deals in atmospherics and a then-what-happened-next plot.  The villians, especially the central villian, are quite deadly and very dangerous.  Not at all cartoony, and may scare the willies out of younger readers.

As reviewers have noted, it's sort of like The Jungle Book, but rather than wild animals, the boy is raised in a graveyard by ghosts and a vampire.  One of the nice things about it is that the book never ever comes right out and says that the vampire is a vampire, but you're able to get it by inference.  Also, there's a werewolf thrown in for good measure.

Like the best of childrens' books -- eg.  The Wind in The Willows, Stuart Little, et. al. -- it can be enjoyed very much by adults as well.  The writing is about what you'd expect:  Precise, concise, and evocative.  Gaiman can have a character say three words, and you immediately know what sort of being they are.  In its own way, I liked it even better than "Anansi Boys", the last book for adults of his I read.  Though I must say, I recently read a short story of his called "A Study In Emerald" that's better than both of them!!

peter johnson/denny crane
Logged

I have no idea what this means.
indianasmith
Archeologist, Theologian, Elder Scrolls Addict, and a
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 1393
Posts: 8149


A good bad movie is like popcorn for the soul!


« Reply #32 on: December 04, 2008, 07:34:59 PM »

I am about a third of the way into Colleen McCullogh's FIRST MAN IN ROME.  I am reading the series out of order, but oh!! they are brilliant.  I want to live in that world so badly at times it hurts.
Logged

"Carpe diem!" - Seize the day!  "Carpe per diem!" - Seize the daily living allowance! "Carpe carp!" - Seize the fish!
"Carpe Ngo Diem!" - Seize the South Vietnamese Dictator!
lester1/2jr
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 648
Posts: 7587



WWW
« Reply #33 on: December 05, 2008, 10:15:08 AM »

Quote
Is that the same Rose Wilder Lane

indeed.  you can also download all their books for free
Logged

Derf
Crazy Rabbity Thingy
Proofreader
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 387
Posts: 2434


Lagomorphs: menace or underutilized resource?


« Reply #34 on: December 05, 2008, 06:12:00 PM »

Mofo:  Dan Simmons lives up the road a piece from me in Longmont, Colorado.  I've never gone up and knocked on his door, nor bothered him in our local pubs, so can't claim personal contact.  Hoping to meet him as part of our local theatre audiences.  Many of his contemporary bits are set in towns very much like Longmont.

I recently finished reading "The Graveyard Book" by Neil Gaiman.  My wife went to hear him read from it, but I was rehearsing that night & couldn't go.  She did get me an autographed copy.

Very good young adult book -- sort of on a Harry Potter level.  Not much really gross, apart from when the protagonist meets up with some ghouls, and no sex to speak of.  Mostly deals in atmospherics and a then-what-happened-next plot.  The villians, especially the central villian, are quite deadly and very dangerous.  Not at all cartoony, and may scare the willies out of younger readers.

As reviewers have noted, it's sort of like The Jungle Book, but rather than wild animals, the boy is raised in a graveyard by ghosts and a vampire.  One of the nice things about it is that the book never ever comes right out and says that the vampire is a vampire, but you're able to get it by inference.  Also, there's a werewolf thrown in for good measure.

Like the best of childrens' books -- eg.  The Wind in The Willows, Stuart Little, et. al. -- it can be enjoyed very much by adults as well.  The writing is about what you'd expect:  Precise, concise, and evocative.  Gaiman can have a character say three words, and you immediately know what sort of being they are.  In its own way, I liked it even better than "Anansi Boys", the last book for adults of his I read.  Though I must say, I recently read a short story of his called "A Study In Emerald" that's better than both of them!!

peter johnson/denny crane

Hey! I'm reading Anansi Boys right now! I had read Gaiman's collaboration with Pratchett (Good Omens) and enjoyed it reasonably well, though I think ultimately I prefer Pratchett on his own. I figured I'd give Gaiman a chance on his own as well. I can't say this one has me riveted, but it is entertaining if slightly pretentious at times (that's just my impression, so take it for what it's worth). Maybe I'll give The Graveyard Book a try and see if I can get into it more than this current one I'm reading. The plot for The Graveyard Book sounds vaguely similar to one of my favorite novels: Peter S. Beagle's A Fine and Private Place, which tells the story of an older man who lives in the graveyard, never leaving it after burying his wife (nothing morbid like a murder or necrophilia; he just wants to stay near her). I can heartily recommend anything by Beagle; the worst thing (and it wasn't really bad) I've read by him was his most famous work, The Last Unicorn.
Logged

"They tap dance not, neither do they fart." --Greensleeves, on the Fig Men of the Imagination, in "Twice Upon a Time."
Psycho Circus
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 1529
Posts: 12052


Shake The Faith


WWW
« Reply #35 on: December 05, 2008, 06:19:37 PM »

Reading my favourite fictional novel again for the 6th time...

Logged

ER
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 281
Posts: 1667



« Reply #36 on: December 05, 2008, 10:26:27 PM »

One of the few King books I haven't read, circus. I'll add it to my list. Ugh, my list, though. It's like two pages long and growing.
Logged

Seeking Tir a 'nOg since 1978.
Psycho Circus
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 1529
Posts: 12052


Shake The Faith


WWW
« Reply #37 on: December 06, 2008, 08:36:14 AM »

One of the few King books I haven't read, circus. I'll add it to my list. Ugh, my list, though. It's like two pages long and growing.

I think it's very underrated and highly recommend it. It's not full of loads of pointless information and confusing back story to flesh out characters. King flicks between the present day situation involving the car and police station and back to the past when it was first discovered and left in the garage. I also didn't see coming, the route that the story took either. Very interesting, so much so, that I've always kept reading and finished this book in 2 days.  Thumbup
Logged

BeyondTheGrave
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 69
Posts: 1386


Punks not Ded sez Rich


« Reply #38 on: December 07, 2008, 02:21:21 PM »

I'm reading "People's History of The United States" by Howard Zinn. So far its a great read and tells it like it was and is.
Logged

Most of all I hate dancing then work,exercise,people,stupidpeople

Joe the Destroyer
Guest
« Reply #39 on: December 07, 2008, 03:25:49 PM »

I read Off Season. It was enjoyable, and didn't leave me with the kicked-in-the-stomach feeling that The Girl Next Door did.

I'm currently reading a multitude of books, but am focusing on The Terror by Dan Simmons. It's a historical horror based off of the lost Franklin expedition to find the Northwest Passage. The men on the two ships get trapped in the ice and must spend the time trying to stay warm while fighting off malnutrition and scurvy. Unfortunately, there is something else out on the ice that slaughters the occasional man from time to time.

It's a great book. I admire how thoroughly the situation goes from bad to worse, and then much worse.


By the time I got to the end of Off Season, I was pretty desensitized to the story and its elements.  I do want to read The Girl Next Door some time, especially since they've made a movie out of it, and I'd like to match the two up.

As stated above, I finished Off Season and will begin reading The Cipher by Kathe Koja.  I've never read any of her stuff, but a friend of mine raved about her.  He even gave me two of her books, the previously mentioned one and Bad Brains.
Logged
Torgo
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 530
Posts: 5272



« Reply #40 on: December 08, 2008, 12:21:38 AM »

I'm going to start reading Duma Key by Stephen King sometime this week. I don't think that he's written a good book in quite a few years but this one has been getting good reviews and some critics have said it's kind of a return to form for him.
Logged

"There is no way out of here. It'll be dark soon. There is no way out of here."
peter johnson
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 107
Posts: 1490



« Reply #41 on: December 10, 2008, 12:35:24 PM »

Derf:
If you're not as familiar with Gaiman, you may find "Neverwhere" or "American Gods" to be more impressive -- "Anansi Boys" is more of a leitmotif for him.  If you read graphic novels, I'd heartily recommend the "Sandman" series that he wrote -- there he really goes all out re. heavy plotting & wild side-stories.  "Anansi Boys" is much more straight-ahead.

A suggestion:  Check out his website & download his short story, "A Study in Emerald", one of the single best Sherlock Holmes imitations ever written:  Conan Doyle meets H.P. Lovecraft!!

peter gaiman/denny fan
Logged

I have no idea what this means.
Mr. DS
Master Of Cinematic Bowel Movements
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 1841
Posts: 15378


Get this thread cleaned up or YOU'RE FIRED!!!


WWW
« Reply #42 on: December 11, 2008, 06:28:09 PM »

Logged

DarkSider's Realm
http://darksidersrealm.blogspot.com/

"You think the honey badger cares?  It doesn't give a sh*t."  Randall
Sister Grace
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 174
Posts: 1038


I found my mind in a brown paper bag...


WWW
« Reply #43 on: December 11, 2008, 07:49:49 PM »

At present, I'm reading Off Season by Jack Ketchum, having just finished The Twilight Realm by Christopher Carpenter (aka Christopher Evans). 

Off Season was a great book; be sure and read its sequeal titled The Offspring, not only is it a fantastic story also, but fills us in alot about the cave family beginnings...
Logged

Society, exactly as it now exists is the ultimate expression of sadomasochism in action.<br />-boyd rice-<br />On the screen, there\\\'s a death and the rustle of cloth; and a sickly voice calling me handsome...<br />-Nick Cave-
ER
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 281
Posts: 1667



« Reply #44 on: December 12, 2008, 12:46:20 AM »

The Ballad of Frankie Silver, by Sharyn McCrumb. It's the sort of novel that takes its toll on a reader's emotions. It's brilliant storytelling but frustrating because of its subject matter: the unjust hanging of a young woman in 19th century Appalachia.
Logged

Seeking Tir a 'nOg since 1978.
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 98
Badmovies.org Forum  |  Other Topics  |  Entertainment  |  Reading anything? « previous next »
    Jump to:  


    RSS Feed Subscribe Subscribe by RSS
    Email Subscribe Subscribe by Email


    Popular Articles
    How To Find A Bad Movie

    The Champions of Justice

    Plan 9 from Outer Space

    Manos, The Hands of Fate

    Podcast: Todd the Convenience Store Clerk

    Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!

    Dragonball: The Magic Begins

    Cool As Ice

    The Educational Archives: Driver's Ed

    Godzilla vs. Monster Zero

    Do you have a zombie plan?

    FROM THE BADMOVIES.ORG ARCHIVES
    ImageThe Giant Claw - Slime drop

    Earth is visited by a GIANT ANTIMATTER SPACE BUZZARD! Gawk at the amazingly bad bird puppet, or chuckle over the silly dialog. This is one of the greatest b-movies ever made.

    Lesson Learned:
    • Osmosis: os·mo·sis (oz-mo'sis, os-) n., 1. When a bird eats something.

    Subscribe to Badmovies.org and get updates by email:

    HOME B-Movie Reviews Reader Reviews Forum Interviews TV Shows Advertising Information Sideshows Links Contact

    Badmovies.org is owned and operated by Andrew Borntreger. All original content is © 1998 - 2014 by its respective author(s). Image, video, and audio files are used in accordance with the Fair Use Law, and are property of the film copyright holders. You may freely link to any page (.html or .php) on this website, but reproduction in any other form must be authorized by the copyright holder.