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September 15, 2014, 08:10:29 PM
533521 Posts in 40359 Topics by 5058 Members
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Badmovies.org Forum  |  Other Topics  |  Entertainment  |  CLASSICAL MUSIC you definitely DON'T like... or that YOU DO LIKE « previous next »
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Author Topic: CLASSICAL MUSIC you definitely DON'T like... or that YOU DO LIKE  (Read 2491 times)
BoyScoutKevin
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« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2009, 04:36:34 PM »

We have talked about Disney's Silly Symphonies." We have talked about the Warner Brothers characters. What we have not talked about is MGM's Tom and Jerry, Nelvana's Care Bears, and Universal's Woody Woodpecker and Andy Panda. All of whom have appeared in animated short subjects that made use of classical music.

And that is not all. Using more anonymous characters, the following pieces of classical music were used in animated short subjects. Often without the use of dialogue, letting the music speak for itself.

Brahms' "Hungarian Dances"

Liszt's "Hungarian Rhapsody no. 2" For this one I do have a title. It is called "Rhapsody in Rivets."

Strauss, jr.'s "The Blue Danube" and "Tales from the Vienna Woods."

Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker Suite." This is the only other one for which I remember the title. It was called "A Holiday for Shoestrings."

Waldteufel's "The Skater's Waltz"

And while not strictly classical, one of my favorite animated short subjects that makes use of music to tell a story is "Mama Don't Allow," which features the Old Woman in the Shoe and all her children.

There is alot out there, using classical music and other music. And much of it is mighty fine.
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Allhallowsday
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Either he's dead or my watch has stopped!


« Reply #16 on: December 15, 2009, 01:57:56 PM »

Here's a Silly Symphony that uses Classical themes: 
Small | Large
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Pilgermann
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« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2009, 04:16:45 PM »

Not from the Classical era but under the general category, I love Charles Ives.  He may come across as a difficult and overly experimental composer, but his music is often playful or full of mystery and deep emotion.  Even his stranger more dischordant work doesn't really come across as crazy to my ears, and it lacks the anxiety that Rev. Powell mentioned about many early 20th century atonal works.

Here's one of his quarter-tone pieces:

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The lovely 3rd movement from his fourth symphony:

Small | Large


A recording of Ives himself playing The Alcotts from his Concord Sonata:
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I think most of the stuff I own on CD is from the 20th Century, stuff like Mahler and Shostakovich.  For some reason I have like, 3 recordings of Rautavaara's Angel of Light.  I'm ashamed to not even own any Mozart of Beethoven!

I have difficulty getting into opera.  I only own one actual opera recording and it's of Messiaen's St. Francois d'Assise.  I've had it for a number of years but have only listened to the 1st of the 4 discs in the set.
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Allhallowsday
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« Reply #18 on: December 16, 2009, 09:08:21 PM »

Not from the Classical era but under the general category, I love Charles Ives.  He may come across as a difficult and overly experimental composer, but his music is often playful or full of mystery and deep emotion.  Even his stranger more dischordant work doesn't really come across as crazy to my ears, and it lacks the anxiety that Rev. Powell mentioned about many early 20th century atonal works.  Here's one of his quarter-tone pieces:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EU85bUyDPWs
The lovely 3rd movement from his fourth symphony:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WImfmwXUQ6M
A recording of Ives himself playing The Alcotts from his Concord Sonata:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gXHjeSamzno...
CHARLES IVES explored areas of music important in its mapping.  His music always educates, and renders, which I consider good things.   Thumbup  I have a bit of IVES on cd compilations, but had quite a few LPs all inherited from a huge "classical" music collection. 
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