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September 18, 2014, 10:55:18 PM
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Badmovies.org Forum  |  Movies  |  Bad Movies  |  when did the cult of the "bad movie" begin? « previous next »
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Author Topic: when did the cult of the "bad movie" begin?  (Read 523 times)
Rev. Powell
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« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2014, 09:13:55 AM »


 anyone know any movies before Airplane which were kind of 'aware' of their own badness?

Would the ABBOTT & COSTELLO MEET ______ series qualify?
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« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2014, 12:20:07 PM »

    I'd have to agree that the late 50's / early 60's "Shock Theatre" phenomenon fueled this; I remember Ghoulardi telling us, "this flick is so bad, kids, you wouldn't BELIEVE! You should just go to bed!"

     O' course, this insured we'd be glued to the set until one in the morning, or even later, depending on what "Milkman's Matinee" was showing.

Ghoulardi Small | Large


Target Earth (1954) Richard Denning, Kathleen Crowley, Virginia Grey Small | Large


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« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2014, 02:37:14 PM »

that probably came out of the fact that Ghoulardi and shows like that had to show those movies because they were the cheapest.


random thought: nostalgia was really big in the 70's. old movie stars and stuff like that. I think we're living in a very non nostalgic age today. Seeing anything that's over 6 months old is considered more or less pointless.
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« Reply #18 on: August 24, 2014, 09:00:35 AM »


random thought: nostalgia was really big in the 70's. old movie stars and stuff like that. I think we're living in a very non nostalgic age today. Seeing anything that's over 6 months old is considered more or less pointless.

yeah but you don't really get nostalgic about stuff that's only 6 months - a couple of years old. however I do agree today is mostly about the newest thing, the next big thing. not old enough to remember how it was in the 70s, but I do remember there was quite a bit of 60s/70s nostalgia going on in the 90s

Richard Linklater's Dazed + Confused from 1994 is almost purely based on nostalgia, and was set in 1976. can't imagine a film made today being set in 1996 and having anywhere near the same enjoyment or nostalgia factor?



yeah but you don't really get nostalgic about stuff that's only 6 months - a couple of years old. however I do agree today is mostly about the newest thing, the next big thing. not old enough to remember how it was in the 70s, but I I remember there was quite a bit of 60s/70s nostalgia going on in the 90s


 anyone know any movies before Airplane which were kind of 'aware' of their own badness?

Would the ABBOTT & COSTELLO MEET ______ series qualify?
don't know as (perhaps ashamedly) I've never seen a single one of them. has to be said they are not big over here in England, hardly ever show them on tv but very occasionally they do crop up
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« Reply #19 on: August 24, 2014, 10:33:11 AM »

The Bob Hope/Bing Crosby Road pictures featured a lot of in-jokes about Hollywood and current politics and even became somewhat self-referential with the humor in the later installments.
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« Reply #20 on: August 24, 2014, 10:48:35 AM »

And you have Vampira from the late 50s who poked fun at the movies shown, simply because the TV station could only afford packages of the crappy second-run titles.

Vampira started in 1954. That's now the earliest "official" cult-like recognition of bad movies as entertainment cited (though it was limited to bad horror movies). Of course, there were probably people riffing the early Edison and Biograph nickelodeon shorts before the turn of the century.
I gotta go with this. Vampira mocked old horror films first.
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« Reply #21 on: August 24, 2014, 11:22:59 AM »

I read about Lost Horizon in that Hollywoods horrible turkeys book or whatever it was. I've always wanted to see it.

It was available to buy from Amazon not too long ago.
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« Reply #22 on: August 24, 2014, 05:23:28 PM »

that probably came out of the fact that Ghoulardi and shows like that had to show those movies because they were the cheapest.


random thought: nostalgia was really big in the 70's. old movie stars and stuff like that. I think we're living in a very non nostalgic age today. Seeing anything that's over 6 months old is considered more or less pointless.

That's the problem with many of today's kids. They won't give anything, even a film classic, a chance. They just dismiss it as old and boring without even watching it - at least that's my own experience with many younger people. Not going to say all.

I think the 90s saw a revival of the popular 70s disaster flicks and the sci-fi genre got another kick-start as well with early 70s style  future dystopia films in both the 90s and 2000s. Nowadays they just remake everything (typically giving it a more action-oriented, comedic dumbed down vibe) and  many young people often immediately assume the new is better in a lot of cases (Star Trek, Doctor Who, Battlestar Galactica, Godzilla, Batman, Spider-Man, Halloween) whether it really is or not...

Agree with the mentions of Hope & Crosby and Abbott & Costello as comedians not afraid to make fun of themselves and one another...

Typically there was a lower budget B-movie that did air with a higher budget movie at one point in time. Suspect that's the real true start of the low budget B-movie (which was undeniably sometimes quite bad)...How about the adult shock films of the 30s warning about drugs and other dangers like the aforementioned Reefer Madness but there was also stuff like The Cocaine Fiends, Assassin of Youth, Marihuana, Narcotic, and Maniac to name but a few...these movies definitely leave many shaking their heads in disbelief.

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« Reply #23 on: August 24, 2014, 05:42:03 PM »

that probably came out of the fact that Ghoulardi and shows like that had to show those movies because they were the cheapest.


random thought: nostalgia was really big in the 70's. old movie stars and stuff like that. I think we're living in a very non nostalgic age today. Seeing anything that's over 6 months old is considered more or less pointless.

That's the problem with many of today's kids. They won't give anything, even a film classic, a chance. They just dismiss it as old and boring without even watching it - at least that's my own experience with many younger people. Not going to say all.


Plus, they won't get off my lawn!

But honestly, when I was a kid/teen, most of my peers didn't give anything older a chance and dismissed it as automatically boring. Hell, most adults now do the same, unless it's something they remember from their own childhood. I don't think anything has changed there.
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« Reply #24 on: August 24, 2014, 07:37:31 PM »

Yeah what's really annoying though is when they can the latest hip "in" thing the greatest thing ever made. Yeah, no it's not.

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« Reply #25 on: August 24, 2014, 07:38:34 PM »

Jase is right about 70's nostalgia in the 90's. remember that song "protect yourself against the 70's"?  one of the only things eddie vedder ever did that i like
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« Reply #26 on: August 25, 2014, 07:47:06 PM »

The Bob Hope/Bing Crosby Road pictures featured a lot of in-jokes about Hollywood and current politics and even became somewhat self-referential with the humor in the later installments.

That series of films was also notorious for "breaking the fourth wall." That is a character in the film speaking directly to the audience watching the film. One example would be from 1947's "Road to Rio," where Bob Hope, as Hot Lips Barton, where after falling off the bicycle he is riding on on the high wire, and barely holding on, he starts yelling: "Help! Help!" Then he turns to the audience and says: "You know, this picture could end right here."

Though the one I remember from the same film is one at the end of the film, where Jerry Colonna, who has been riding to the rescue of Hope and Crosby, stops, as they no longer needed rescuing, and turns to the audience and makes some sort of comment.
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« Reply #27 on: August 25, 2014, 10:42:21 PM »

Actually they're still doing disaster and dystopian sci-fi flicks which I feel definitely gained popularity late 60s, early 70s but really one could argue it was done way back in the 30s with Deluge and Things To Come. Actually a lot of 1950s-1970s drive-in fare also recalls the shock films of the 1930s in some ways. Actually you could argue there are some examples in almost every decade since the 30s except maybe the 40s especially when you throw in alien invasion films. Still I think it was at its most popular late 60s, early 70s. Everything old becomes new again it seems.

The poking fun at themselves in film may well have started with the Hope and Crosby Road films or Abbott and Costello, I'm not sure. Hmm if there was no Buster Keaton, would there have been Jackie Chan? Interesting stuff to think about, perhaps a tad off topic though. Back to when the bad movie "cult" following began...probably when people could gather together and watch bad movies in an enjoyable way - maybe drive-ins, home video, late night movies on tv with horror hosts or without...
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« Reply #28 on: August 26, 2014, 08:00:02 AM »

I like to think of the original line from the first KTMA version of MST3K.
"Joel says when you got lemons, you make lemonade."

Well, if 90% of everything is crap, and only 10% is good, and only 10% of that is excellent...that leaves a LOT of manure in which jokes may grow.
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