Bad Movie Logo
"A website to the detriment of good film"
Custom Search
HOMEB-MOVIE REVIEWSREADER REVIEWSFORUMINTERVIEWSUPDATESABOUT
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
June 07, 2023, 03:18:42 AM
699548 Posts in 52429 Topics by 7479 Members
Latest Member: BrigidaWoo
Badmovies.org Forum  |  Movies  |  Good Movies  |  Losing Digital Movies « previous next »
Pages: [1]
Author Topic: Losing Digital Movies  (Read 344 times)
ER
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 1647
Posts: 11890


The sleep of reasoner breeds monsters. (sic)


« on: March 14, 2023, 12:21:19 PM »

Many old films have decayed and are lost. Can you foresee a time where an event, either accidental or deliberate or simply the evolution of digital itself, causes significant quantities of digital content, like movies, to also be lost?
Logged

What does not kill me makes me stranger.
Trevor
Uncle Zombie and Eminent Crapologist
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 2029
Posts: 21441



« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2023, 03:06:30 AM »

Many old films have decayed and are lost. Can you foresee a time where an event, either accidental or deliberate or simply the evolution of digital itself, causes significant quantities of digital content, like movies, to also be lost?

Definitely see it.
Logged

"Life, English."
"Life, Rajah."
Archivist
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 107
Posts: 1364


« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2023, 07:44:05 PM »

This situation concerns me, especially with the rise of streaming services and the decline of physical media purchases. I like to have a physical copy of every movie I like, just in case whatever streaming service no longer licenses it. For this reason, I've bought copies of TV shows like Hannibal, which Netflix no longer carries in Australia.

On the other hand, the proliferation of digital media and file sharing means that obscure movies are becoming easier to find, and will still exist somewhere on someone's hard drive. Niche movies attract the attention of collectors, who theoretically invest in better redundant storage. People still trade and download files, duplicating them all over the world. All it takes is one person to upload an obscure movie to YouTube and it becomes available to everyone with an internet connection. And the more obscure something is, the less likely it will receive a copystrike. There are dozens of movies on YouTube that can't be found on DVD.
Logged

"Many others since have tried & failed at making a watchable parasite slug movie" - LilCerberus
Archivist
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 107
Posts: 1364


« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2023, 10:33:30 PM »

For example: check out this fantastic YouTube channel with a huge array of old trailers. So many I've never seen before. Channels like this would inspire people to find the accompanying movies, and the downloading and stockpiling would continue.

https://www.youtube.com/@HDRT/videos
Logged

"Many others since have tried & failed at making a watchable parasite slug movie" - LilCerberus
Jim H
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 306
Posts: 3617



« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2023, 06:56:13 PM »

Many old films have decayed and are lost. Can you foresee a time where an event, either accidental or deliberate or simply the evolution of digital itself, causes significant quantities of digital content, like movies, to also be lost?

Absolutely.  There's definitely been lost content from the early days of the internet.  Cloud backups and huge amounts of storage in it have made that less likely, but it's still not impossible. I can definitely see some smaller films that didn't get much distribution eventually getting lost, especially stuff from the very early days, like shot on MiniDV features.  If they were edited and just put on a couple screeners, and then the creator just never put them anywhere major online, they could easily get lost to a couple hard drive failures or a flood in their home, that kind of thing.  There were still people working in basically regional areas with just some friends sharing with family or at a college, that kind of thing, when putting them online was difficult.  

An example I know of off-hand is James Rolfe, who does the AVGN videos these days.  He made a couple features in high school and college, shot on analog tape and miniDV.  He eventually put them online, but for over a decade they were just on his hard drives and tapes at his parent's house.  A house fire would have made them lost forever.  This would have been films from like 1998-2000.  There are probably other features that never got put online from the 90s to early 2000s in a similar boat, just sitting in storage.  Over time more and more of these will get lost, as even without catastrophe MiniDV tape and HDDs don't last forever.

Major, big budget movies, these days though - I don't think that will happen again in our lifetime, barring a catastrophic collapse of civilization.  They're just in too many different places.
Logged
Archivist
Frightening Fanatic of Horrible Cinema
****

Karma: 107
Posts: 1364


« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2023, 02:31:54 AM »

In Australia, and presumably in many other countries, there is a legal mandate which states that written works published in any given region must be submitted to the State Library and the National Library for their records. They prefer electronic submissions, but will take physical books.

In 2012, there was a movement by the National Film and Sound Archive to extend this to audiovisual material, which would include movies, tv shows, commercials and the like. This would be of great benefit for the longevity of digital content, as it would be stored in a national facility. Now, this does bring up the question of whether a government funded entity can be trusted with everything regardless of political leanings or content, but that's another issue.
Logged

"Many others since have tried & failed at making a watchable parasite slug movie" - LilCerberus
Trevor
Uncle Zombie and Eminent Crapologist
B-Movie Kraken
*****

Karma: 2029
Posts: 21441



« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2023, 04:20:58 AM »

In Australia, and presumably in many other countries, there is a legal mandate which states that written works published in any given region must be submitted to the State Library and the National Library for their records. They prefer electronic submissions, but will take physical books.

In 2012, there was a movement by the National Film and Sound Archive to extend this to audiovisual material, which would include movies, tv shows, commercials and the like. This would be of great benefit for the longevity of digital content, as it would be stored in a national facility. Now, this does bring up the question of whether a government funded entity can be trusted with everything regardless of political leanings or content, but that's another issue.

South Africa has a Legal Deposit Act too: the problem is that most filmmakers ignore it.
Logged

"Life, English."
"Life, Rajah."
Pages: [1]
Badmovies.org Forum  |  Movies  |  Good Movies  |  Losing Digital Movies « previous next »
    Jump to:  


    RSS Feed Subscribe Subscribe by RSS
    Email Subscribe Subscribe by Email


    Popular Articles
    How To Find A Bad Movie

    The Champions of Justice

    Plan 9 from Outer Space

    Manos, The Hands of Fate

    Podcast: Todd the Convenience Store Clerk

    Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!

    Dragonball: The Magic Begins

    Cool As Ice

    The Educational Archives: Driver's Ed

    Godzilla vs. Monster Zero

    Do you have a zombie plan?

    FROM THE BADMOVIES.ORG ARCHIVES
    ImageThe Giant Claw - Slime drop

    Earth is visited by a GIANT ANTIMATTER SPACE BUZZARD! Gawk at the amazingly bad bird puppet, or chuckle over the silly dialog. This is one of the greatest b-movies ever made.

    Lesson Learned:
    • Osmosis: os·mo·sis (oz-mo'sis, os-) n., 1. When a bird eats something.

    Subscribe to Badmovies.org and get updates by email:

    HOME B-Movie Reviews Reader Reviews Forum Interviews TV Shows Advertising Information Sideshows Links Contact

    Badmovies.org is owned and operated by Andrew Borntreger. All original content is © 1998 - 2014 by its respective author(s). Image, video, and audio files are used in accordance with the Fair Use Law, and are property of the film copyright holders. You may freely link to any page (.html or .php) on this website, but reproduction in any other form must be authorized by the copyright holder.