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Author Topic: Toys from your childhood.  (Read 4708 times)
Eirik
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« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2003, 11:30:44 PM »

It begins and ends with Lincoln Logs.  You could build with 'em.  You could pretend the larger pieces were guns.  You could chuck 'em at each other without getting hurt too bad.  

I saw that they brought Lincoln Logs back and are selling them at Toys R Us.  I'm buying a set for my soon-to-be-born kid and will give them to him/her for Christmas 2006.  It's good to get Christmas shopping out of the way early.
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trekgeezer
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« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2003, 11:38:15 PM »

I got a blonde  Army GI Joe  Christmas  1964.  My Mattel Tommy Gun my mother got me with  S&H trading stamps (this really dates me).  I  also had a Major Matt  Mason astronaut  figure with  rocket pack.  

I have always  been a Science Fiction nut.  My usual  tv fare was Twilight Zone, Outer Limits,  Star  Trek,  Man  from U.N.C.L.E, and of course  Jonny  Quest.  I always wanted to be  Race  Bannon ,  he got the girls,  got to fly all sorts of neat aircraft, and he got to shoot guns a lot.  What  else could a guy ask for ?

Like  Flangepart I also have  and  Enterprise, a Klingon  BOP and  Vorcha Class   Battlecruiser on my desk. I just haven't gotten around to working on the StarFury yet.  I also have a closet  full of assorted mostly Star Trek toys, action figures, and ornaments.

I know I'm  never  growing up!

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« Reply #17 on: November 07, 2003, 11:48:07 PM »

We had two models in our home that we put together. One was THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME and the other was GODZILLA.

This is some stuff I haven't thought of in a while. Let me remember. It was the 70's ............. Okay here is a small list.

Baseball Cards (7,000 completely different)
Coin Collection (Indian head pennies, Buffalo head nickels, Mercury head dimes, Silver dollars, etc.)
Green Army Men (spent hours with them, also had Indians, Cowboys, Calvary, Germans, tanks, artillary, etc.)
Action Jackson (poor mans G.I. Joe)
Tyco Electric Car Race Track
B-B Gun
Tonka Toys
Hot Wheels, Matchbox, Johnny Lightnings, and Tinker toys
Telestar (first in the niehborhood to have it. Tennis with the two lines and the dot. )

The one thing that I remember not getting was:

 Air Hockey.

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JohnL
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« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2003, 02:42:57 AM »

>* The STARSHIP ENTERPRISE play set, with all the action figures.

I had this, but I think i got a defective Kirk because he didn't sit properly. Got given away to someone at one point, although I kept Spock.

>* The old G.I. Joe's . . . the ones with plastic hair, the ones with life-like hair and >beard, the ones with Kung-Fu grip. Plus, I had several play sets like CURSE OF

I had a G.I. Joe with the life-like hair & beard and he spoke when you pulled the string. I could never get it to say what I wanted though. I also had the HQ with working search light, and the submarine.

>* THE SIX MILLION DOLLAR MAN action figure

Had this one too, plus the rocket/operating table. I always wanted the Maskatron robot, but never got it.

>Plus, I had this neat prehistoric village set. It had plastic cliffs and trees and stuff,
>plus cave men and dinosaurs. You could put the dinosaurs into this vice
>contraption and squeeze them into little cubes (about the size of Star Burst
>candies). Then you could put the cubes into this little oven contraption and heat
>them up. When they got heated, they would unfold back into their dinosaur
>shapes.

I got one of those at the flea market once, but the vise broke not long after I got it and would no longer compact the creatures. They fetch pretty good prices on eBay.

I had a lot of the same construction toys as others, Legos, Lincoln Logs, Tinker Toys etc. I also had this neat building construction set where you made the skeleton of the building using plastic 'girders' and then snap on plastic window panels, plus a similar set for building bridges.

As for more specific toys;

*Lost in Space Remco robot. I still have it, slightly scuffed up and with the claws glued on the arms, but mostly intact. This was probably my favorite toy.

*Space 1999 Eagle. This was like 2-3 feet long, opened up and you could put figures inside. The figures all broke in half (they were pretty fragile) and I lost the tiny little guns, but I still have the ship.

*Star Wars figures (original), plus the X-Wing and Tie Fighters.

*A large styrofoam ship with an attached remote-control helicopter. It was attached by an arm so it would only fly in circles, but it could hover, pick up targets etc. I was incredibly disappointed when it stopped working. When Christmas rolled around, my parents couldn't find a replacement for it, so they got me a Star Trek Enterprise that was the same principle (the propeller was under the saucer), but it never worked the way it was supposed to.

*A large plastic crane. Had a lever to switch functions and and a crank to rotate it, lower the crane etc. After like a year of use, it started squeeking badly, so I got the brilliant idea to oil it. It never worked properly after that. :(

*Model trains. I started out just liking all trains, but as I got older, my preferences went toward old-time steam trains (like 1880-1900).

How about toys you always wanted, but never got? I have two big ones;

The 18" Kenner Alien figure. It was quite expensive and they took them off the market pretty quickly.

Mighty Casey Railroad. A gaint train set large enough for kids to ride on. I wanted one in the worst way, but they just cost way too much. I had visions of getting on and laying track all over the yard.
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AndyC
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« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2003, 11:16:49 AM »

One thing is for sure, my kids are going to learn to be creative. Had this conversation with my wife, and we're both agreed that solitary TV watching is not going to be considered a legitimate option when there are other things to do. I've watched too many other people use the TV as a babysitter, and seen what it's done to their kids. Naturally, I have to balance this with my desire to share my favourite movies with the kids, when they are old enough. Of course, watching a movie with dad is not the same as vegging out in front of the tube. At our house, TV is going to be a family activity, as it was when I was a kid, and there will be arts and crafts and sports and games and music and tools and church and other things to make up the bulk of the entertainment options.

On the subject of imaginary games, some of the best times I had as a kid were playing with a kid around the corner (my best friend until about grade 5). He had a garage full of old junk that his dad kept around - drums and pails and cans, old wooden skids and assorted pieces of things. We used to have the best time stacking and arranging these things to build space ships and robots and things like that. We could fight whole space battles, piloting two stationary piles of junk facing each other in his back yard. It was great fun. Kids who don't play those kinds of games are really missing out, and I think they suffer for it in later life.

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Susan
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« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2003, 01:36:56 PM »

I loved imagination games. Mine always involved me as a secret agent or a spy, lurking about the neighborhood. In arizona we had a sandpit at the end of the street (people had gravel and dirt in their yards vs. grass so they used to pile these mountains of it in this empty lot). I would climb to the top of the gravel pit, dig a little trenchhole and we would be at war, trying to defend our castle. Ok, so i was a tomboy. Sure I had tv but I wasn't allowed to just watch it all the time, my folks expected me to get the hell out of the house and they had to drag me in when it was dark. So what if it was 100F with 100% humidity - we would just come up with clever things like filling plastic glasses with water the night before and placing them in the freezer and then when it got hot the next day take it out and have a huge cylinder of an ice block to gnaw on while outside. Because yeah, my parents didn't have koolaid or ice pops on hand 24 hours...so we just had to enjoy a hunk of ice

I went through a phase where I was in a futureworld where everyone wore rollerskates..that was the late 70's when it was popular..lol, because we had no rinks where I lived so we skated outside till the rubbers wore right off of those wheels. Sometimes we'd have races or the older kids might be nice and let us hold onto the back of their bike while they peddle..of course it was too late to realize the cruel intention when they spend off very fast and raced over bumps and into the dir. We'd spy on or try to follow the older kids, mostly our brothers, who you knew were up to no good when they grabbed their dirtbikes and headed off someplace they werent' allowed. My parents rarely heard "I'm bored", or "There's nothing to do" from us. We FOUND things to do, with board planks, sticks, whatever was around or we could get our hands on without mom or dad finding out. That's when your parents didn't quite know what you were up to when you were rummeging through the closet looking for a sheet. I think half my childhood I heard my parents voices of "put that back! What do you think you're doing with that?!" We also grew up in an area where thei neighbors and the locals would tell on you if you were up to no good or whip you themselves..lol

Of course in the philippines we had monsoon weather so yeah..we even played outside in the rain all day. Staying inside was a Punishment no kid wanted, we even hated being called in for lunch for fear we'd miss something good. Now kids act like going outside is a punishment...

"But it's HOT, there's nothing to DO! Nobody's out there!  I wanna watch cartoons or play on the computer!" I remember my friend even giving excuses for her kids not being out "It's too hot for them to play". I'm thinking this is the same girl that when we were younger we stayed out so long in the heat once we came back blistered and red.

So what if they complain, kick their butt outside and lock the door..lol



Post Edited (11-08-03 13:27)
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AndyC
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« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2003, 03:45:32 PM »

Yep, I can remember when practically every house in our neighbourhood had kids, ranging from slightly younger than me to a few years older. Now it's pretty much a neighbourhood full of old people (our parents). On summer evenings, there were huge games of hide and seek, tag or whatever. These games might have as many as a dozen kids and span several properties. My dad had a cedar tree in the back yard that never grew above two feet for years. It was always finding its way into some rough game. When everybody grew up and stopped playing, it grew higher than the roof in a few years. Nowadays, kids just generally seem to think that those kinds of games are lame, especially if it's something that requires them to participate and interact with other kids.

My friends and I used to spend a lot of time just riding our bikes. We'd ride them downtown, to the corner store, the library, or just around the nearby streets. Or we'd go down to a big park on the other side of town and go fishing. Nothing to catch but shiners and suckers. Nothing edible, and you wouldn't have wanted to eat it anyway, because that stretch of river ran past cow pastures, a junkyard and the local chemical plant, but it was all about the catching.

When we got older, we'd ride our bikes out to the reservoir, or to nearby towns, just for the hell of it. Since all of the surrounding towns were smaller, there was less to do there than at home, but getting there and back was an adventure. These were places we could only get to if our parents drove us. It was independence. One afternoon, we did actually ride all the way to the nearest city. Nothing to do there either, so we came back.

Then there were go-carts. Not those motorized things you pay to drive. These things were homemade. A 2x4 with a plywood seat screwed to it, a 2x4 nailed crosswise for a back axle, and another at the front, attached with a single bolt that allowed you to steer. A rope was attached for steering, and lawnmower wheels for rolling. Propulsion came from a guy running behind you, pushing against the back of the cart with a broken hockey stick. Guys would dress them up with paint and decals, and even fake fur seat covers made from scraps stolen out of the garbage at the local textile mill. They were quite popular in the late 70s. I can remember fall fair parades in which the street was filled, side to side, with decorated go-carts.

These days, it's hard to get some kids to go to a fair, much less participate. I can remember, just a few years ago, overhearing a couple of bored kids who were basically standing around with nothing to do. One of them suggested that there was "some kind of a fair or something" going on. The other one said he went once, and it sucked. It's not like Canada's Wonderland. I felt like shaking the little bugger and telling him he's about seventy miles from Canada's frigging Wonderland, and doesn't appear to be going there any time soon. These little morons are standing there with nothing better to do, and the fair wasn't good enough for them. Standing around b***hing was actually preferable. We used to bike down to the fairgrounds and watch the trucks come in. I knew some enterprising guys who hung around during the setup, and made lunch runs for the carnies - bike down to Kentucky Fried Chicken in exchange for a bit of cash or a free test ride. We'd spend a couple of weeks working on parade entries and junior exhibits. These kids were barely aware that there was a fair. Why? because we live in an age where every major city has a kick-ass amusement park that runs all the time, and every moderate sized city has at least a sports park with some amusement-type stuff. Hell, every school carnival and store opening around here seems to have a bouncy castle. I said it in one of the Halloween discussions. There is so much everyday stuff do do, the special things get lost.

I used to try organizing community activities for kids, but I don't anymore. For every one who has fun, there's three or four who do nothing but b***h, and those are the ones who bother to show up at all. They've been taught that it's the responsibility of others to provide them with things to do, and that only flashy and expensive activities are worth doing. Their standards are set according to the best thing out there, and anything else automatically sucks, even if it's the best someone can provide for them.



Post Edited (11-09-03 09:18)
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Ash
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« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2003, 05:23:42 PM »

While I played with most toys that are mentioned here on this thread, I forgot to add my absolute favorite toys of all....

Toy guns!

I used to have about 20 of them ranging from pistols to a fake AK-47 assault rifle.
You might remember that in the 80's they looked like REAL guns...before the red tips at the end of the barrells were required by federal law so the cops wouldn't shoot you dead by accident.

The Ak-47 was my all time favorite but while running with it while "playing guns" with my friends I tripped & fell and the first thing to hit the ground was the plastic barrell of the gun, snapping it off like a twig.
Man was I p**sed!

I still haven't lost my interest for guns.  I've recently gotten heavy into Airsoft.  These guns look exactly like the real thing.  They are all full size replicas.
I have an MP-5 smg, a SIG 550 assault rifle, a Czech Skorpion machine pistol with a folding stock (looks like the Klobb from Goldeneye for the N64) & another silver handheld pistol but I cannot seem to figure out which company makes it.  
They all come with the red tips but I paint over them to make them look totally authentic.  They all shoot those small yellow plastic BB's that do hurt like hell when shot with.
My next purchase will be an AK-47 Spetznatz that I've had my eye on for awhile at a local shop.
GO here to check more out:  
www.shortyusa.com  (click where it says "spring guns")

Did any of you "play guns" around the neighborhood when you were a kid?



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Flangepart
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« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2003, 05:38:54 PM »

Oh,Oh!...forgot to mention the 10 tall B9 robot! "Danger, Danger Will Robinson!"
Adult toys? Well, i have a Ruger MK2 and 10/22 pistol and rifle. A Moisan-Nagant 7.62 x 54R carbins. A .303 Lee-Enfield Mk3*, a Ruger Security Six .357, A Mossburg M88 12 gage, and finaly, a H&R .50 black power deer gun.
Man....i'm well armed even for my neibourhood!
Do not burgle the homes of Rednecks. It is folly.

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Susan
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« Reply #24 on: November 08, 2003, 06:15:06 PM »

Andy, kids today are overstimulated. I mean if you start a 3 year old off on one of those motorized cars vs a simple tricycle..you can imagine what they'll expect when they're 9. When I was a kid we hardly ever went out anywhere so even if our parents went to some grown up movie or to a sit down resturaunt we begged to go and we were also were expected to behave accordingly. We didn't raise a fuss and they bribed us to be quiet with a toy or ice cream. If we did act up we knew we wouldn't be taken back to another resturaunt or movie for the rest of our natural lives...

Hell we were thrilled just to get out. I hate to sound so old saying "kids today", it really doesn't have ANYTHING to do with the kids themself. Kids are kids, it's how they are conditioned from an early age by their parents and society. I think a big problem is that my generation and just over grew up without a bunch of toys (in comparison to today) and with ALL these new gimicky gadgets..well it appeals to the child in them and they over-indulge in buying these for *their* kids. Plus maybe it's a guilt thing because more parents today are two-income families than my folks generation at the time..and they spend less time with the kids and perhaps feel guilty. Or maybe we're a generation that idol-worships children and wish to do nothing but please and appease our gods..lol

When my godson was at his 4th birthday party he got tons of expensive things..i mean expensive gadgets and things kids deemed as *way cool*. But those electronic things lose their novelty in about 2 seconds. The next thing I knew kids were teeming around me, all dying to participate in the fun of the gift I bought him which was less than $2. It was that tube of goo you blow with a straw into giant plastic balls. So yeah, every kid I get the chance to hang out with I'll grab a cardboard box and we'll build a house or a castle. Or i'll pass on games like :
red light - green light
mother may I
tag
hide and seek
statues
comety come (i spy)
hide the thimble..yeah I have family games passed on from my great grandparents day that I still remember.

I think games like musical chairs, duck duck goose and simon probably are banned. Because it would be a sin to have children lose at something and risk possibly lowering their self esteem (so we must give even the losing team trophies...that way they feel special too and the winning team doesn't really feel that special since everyone has essentially won)

I still liked to play on my atari and watch tv, but it's a fine balance folks...kids NEED imagination time. Plus my dad would have had a holy fit if he knew that tv was running all day long. What kind of memories will they grew up with? Nopiling into the back of the station wagon and getting a bucket of KFC original and heading to the drive-in wearing your PJ's. Or dusk bike rides when your racing with the sun to get home. I remember i'd get on my bike and all day it would be an adventure. I'd cross the highway bridge and head over to the little store and spend a good half hour in the parking lot scoping for dropped pocket-change. Then when I had enough i'd go in and buy some cinnamon toothpicks or if I had enough, candy.

It'll be sitting in front of the x-box in a room full of toys you never play with.



Post Edited (11-08-03 17:27)
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Scott
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« Reply #25 on: November 08, 2003, 07:04:03 PM »

Oh yea lincoln logs. Forgot about them.

How about Green Slime in a can. It was a late 70's thing. I use to let it ooze all over my brothers miniture train villiage.

Board games that I use to play were Monopoly, Battleship, Stratego, Clue, Pay Day, Life, Tank Battle, and Carrier Strike.

We use to play soldier and spy from sun up to sun down. As we got older the spy game went quite far.

Building fortresses was another thing we did and store ammo in the ground. By spring the nuts and other things were beginning to sprout. We built tree forts as well.

Skateboarding in the High School late at night. The janitors would chase us out of the building. One of our bunch would put a pebble in the H.S. door which was just enough to put it ajar.

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Eirik
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« Reply #26 on: November 09, 2003, 01:52:36 AM »

How about Green Slime in a can. It was a late 70's thing. I use to let it ooze all over my brothers miniture train villiage.
*****  YES!  Then they also had purple slime with rubber worms in it - remember?  Then to capitalize on the slime craze, you used to see it in grocery store gumball machines too (in those opening plastic bubbles).  Man, that was gross.  I loved it.
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Eirik
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« Reply #27 on: November 09, 2003, 01:57:36 AM »

"I think games like musical chairs, duck duck goose and simon probably are banned. Because it would be a sin to have children lose at something and risk possibly lowering their self esteem"

My wife works in a school and tells me that children aren't allowed to play dodgeball anymore.. Dodgeball!!  How can a school, in good conscience, graduate some wuss who's never sensed the danger of a ball whizzing at his head?  Who's never tasted the bloodlust of whaling a ball at someone from six feet away?  I swear, someday we're gonna get conquered by Mexico.
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AndyC
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« Reply #28 on: November 09, 2003, 10:49:49 AM »

Oh yeah. Toy guns. I used to have cap pistols and squirt guns that resembled colourful plastic replicas of real guns. My favourites, however, were a plastic machine gun with a mechanism inside that made a ratatat noise when you pulled the trigger, and an air rifle. This thing wasn't made to fire anything, but would build up air pressure when you pulled the lever action, and make a loud pop when you pulled the trigger. Good quality too - metal construction with a sturdy plastic stock. I soon discovered that if you jam a cork in the end, the air pressure would shoot it pretty far.

Man, I can remember playing in the neighbourhood with those guns, taking them out on Halloween, and possibly even taking one of them to school once. No doubt I'd find myself in a heap of trouble these days.

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JohnL
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« Reply #29 on: November 09, 2003, 06:23:15 PM »

I used to use my imagination quite a bit, but unfortunately, I never had very many friends to play with. My mother and grandparents were INCREDIBLY over-protective, so I was hardly allowed out of our yard alone until I was in highschool! No riding a bike all over the neighborhood, no disappearing off someplace with friends. Mostly I played alone either in the house of in the yard. On the times friends came over, we'd either do something out in the yard, or play video games. As you can probably imagine, most of my friends quickly got restless and wanted to go places, but I wasn't allowed.

>Toy guns!

I had quite a few of those. One of my favorites until it eventually broke was a very realistic looking revolver. It was all metal except for the plastic grips. I also had the typical western style cap guns that took the rolls of paper caps. I also once had a western style rifle that had bullets you could load and fire.

>I've recently gotten heavy into Airsoft. These guns look exactly like the real thing.
>They are all full size replicas.

I've got a few plastic replica guns that I've built from kits. A couple of them fire weak replica bullets (uses a short spring for a range of maybe 6 feet), that is when the tips don't pop off by accident. I also have one that was designed to be more of a toy than a replica. It looks good, but they sacrificed some realism to make it fire mushroom shaped plastic pellets. Those things hurt.

I've also seen catalogs advertising "blowback" replica guns. They're plastic kits and the bullets take a small cap. They don't actually shoot anything, but the cap mimics the action of a real gun. They even make M16's that can be fired full-auto.
They're expensive though.
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