Badmovies.org Forum

Other Topics => Entertainment => Topic started by: ER on March 10, 2020, 02:14:15 PM



Title: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: ER on March 10, 2020, 02:14:15 PM
[Edit: Continued from http://www.badmovies.org/forum/index.php/topic,122070.0.html (http://www.badmovies.org/forum/index.php/topic,122070.0.html)]

Time for a new reading thread.

I finally finished reading Mark Twain's 1860s reports home from Hawaii.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on March 10, 2020, 02:15:50 PM
I am in the middle of a biography of William McKinley.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: FatFreddysCat on March 11, 2020, 05:53:58 AM
Monty Python Speaks! by David Morgan


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: BoyScoutKevin on March 12, 2020, 05:21:58 PM
Facts from Peggy Orenstein's Boys and Sex : Young Men on Hookups, Love, Porn, Consent, and Navigating the New Masculinity. A sequel to her earlier Girls and Sex.

1. While we think of young men, as being a group, we ought to, instead, think of them as being individuals.

2. Young women have made more progress navigating the new sexuality than young men.

3. If we neglect our young women, when it comes to the new sexuality, we neglect our young men even more.

4. While young men may be less vulnerable to sexual exploitation than young women, they are still vulnerable, which makes them in some ways even more vulnerable.

5. It is a problem that has no easy solutions.

6. Not only do some men want to turn the clock back to the old sexuality, so do some women.

7. As sad as all this may be, there is still hope today and in the future.

8. Today, we are more accepting of young men who are sexually different than we have been in the passt.

9. Tomorrow, the young men of today know what they are missing, and it is with hope, that they will, when they have young men of their own, will fill in what is missing.

10. I have never seen higher reviews for a book on Amazon, then I have for this one. Almost all 5* reviews.

Next time: we will see what we may see.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: ER on March 12, 2020, 07:20:55 PM
Facts from Peggy Orenstein's Boys and Sex : Young Men on Hookups, Love, Porn, Consent, and Navigating the New Masculinity. A sequel to her earlier Girls and Sex.

1. While we think of young men, as being a group, we ought to, instead, think of them as being individuals.

2. Young women have made more progress navigating the new sexuality than young men.

3. If we neglect our young women, when it comes to the new sexuality, we neglect our young men even more.

4. While young men may be less vulnerable to sexual exploitation than young women, they are still vulnerable, which makes them in some ways even more vulnerable.

5. It is a problem that has no easy solutions.

6. Not only do some men want to turn the clock back to the old sexuality, so do some women.

7. As sad as all this may be, there is still hope today and in the future.

8. Today, we are more accepting of young men who are sexually different than we have been in the passt.

9. Tomorrow, the young men of today know what they are missing, and it is with hope, that they will, when they have young men of their own, will fill in what is missing.

10. I have never seen higher reviews for a book on Amazon, then I have for this one. Almost all 5* reviews.

Next time: we will see what we may see.

Yeah, since they re-invented sex we now have that whole new way babies get made. Personally I think the old method had a lot going for it. (People shore do like to re-make the wheel.)


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: RCMerchant on March 14, 2020, 09:15:46 PM
One Flew Over the Cukoos Nest by Ken Kesey.
In the novel, it's narrated by Chief, the big Indian guy.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on March 29, 2020, 09:30:22 AM
Just picked up "Film Out of Bounds: Essays and Interviews in Non-Mainstream Cinema Worldwide." Covers Neil Jordan, Herschell Gordon Lewis, Dario Argento and Guy Maddin, among others.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on March 29, 2020, 09:53:18 AM
On my best friend's recommendation, I'm reading SARUM: THE NOVEL OF ENGLAND by Edward Rutherford.
It's a marvelous, sprawling historical epic.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Neville on April 02, 2020, 08:05:05 AM
I got a copy of "Nostromo" by Joseph Conrad from my local library just before the quarantine. I was expecting it to last longer than usual on my nightstand, but now there's no pressure or need to call for an extension.

It's a fascinating book. It deals with a series of characters -mostly expatriates- living in an imaginary latinamerican country towards the end of the XIXth century. The point of view is debatable -we're supposed to despise the locals and root for the foreigners who run things instead-, but the personal stories are fantastic and the language is a thing of beauty.

I've had a love-hate relationship with Conrad for years, but this novel has definitely won me over.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on April 03, 2020, 09:46:10 AM
Just placed in my bathroom:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51vA-aV4wuL.jpg)

Since they didn't tape the show, this is my only opportunity to see (in my mind's eye) the re-riff of EEGAH.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: chefzombie on April 03, 2020, 01:20:25 PM
blind voices by tom reamy, a brilliant writer who died far too young. i've had this for 41 years now, and i read it every year. it haunts me.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: lester1/2jr on April 04, 2020, 07:24:16 PM
Celine "Journey to the end of Night"


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on May 01, 2020, 09:16:13 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81P4%2BFuXG8L.jpg)

A lot of people don't like the Medveds because they're too snarky and seem like they don't truly love the movies they criticize, but they are the pioneers of "bad movie" appreciation.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on May 04, 2020, 08:42:24 AM
Just started a critical biography of Luis Bunuel titled "Luis Bunuel."


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: chefzombie on May 04, 2020, 04:22:15 PM
"outside looking in" by t.c.boyle.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: lester1/2jr on June 05, 2020, 08:40:04 PM
"50 greatest movies never Made"

I read this 20 years ago and i think i posted it here? anyway is about movies that were almost made but weren't, ultimately. One was a comedy called Jaws 3, People 0, written by national Lampoon and sounds like it was pretty funny. the studios decided to do Jaws 3 in 3d instead.

Hitchcock had one that was a blind man regains his sight, then goes to disneyland where some sort of caper happens. Walt Disney hated Psycho and it never came off.

The guy who made Ren and Stimpy had a script for a ridiculous movie about 4 guys who think superheroes are wimps because they have super powers. They build their own headquarters because they are real men. Ultimately, they are so tough they punch a hole in time itself and then the trouble starts


https://www.amazon.com/50-Greatest-Movies-Never-Made/dp/031220082X (https://www.amazon.com/50-Greatest-Movies-Never-Made/dp/031220082X)

very cool book that would probably be a Medium post you would never find out about today


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on June 27, 2020, 09:45:01 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51GrkkNdROL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Written by a friend of mine (who had some posts on here years ago, though I don't remember what handle he used). About his unhappy upbringing in a Pentecostal sect. I read a couple of idfferent early drafts, and from what I've read so far it's really come far.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Alex on June 27, 2020, 10:31:59 AM
The Dragonlance trilogy.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on July 14, 2020, 05:34:49 PM
THE UNEXPECTED PRESIDENT: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF CHESTER A. ARTHUR by Scott S. Greenberger

An entertaining and sympathetic look at the life of the only American President I can say with some confidence I am related to.  Arthur was James Garfield's Vice President and stepped into the presidency when Garfield was murdered in 1881.  Arthur was a lifelong political hack, a corrupt spoilsman in thrall to New York's notorious boss, Senator Roscoe Conkling.  But Arthur surprised everyone be becoming a champion of Civil Service Reform and honest government as President, cutting his ties to his corrupt former associates and signing the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act into law.  I knew a little bit about his career, but this biography filled in a lot of corners and brought this New York dandy who turned into a model of Presidential character into sharp focus.  Highly recommended!


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Sitting Duck on July 15, 2020, 07:53:02 AM
THE UNEXPECTED PRESIDENT: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF CHESTER A. ARTHUR by Scott S. Greenberger

An entertaining and sympathetic look at the life of the only American President I can say with some confidence I am related to.  Arthur was James Garfield's Vice President and stepped into the presidency when Garfield was murdered in 1881.  Arthur was a lifelong political hack, a corrupt spoilsman in thrall to New York's notorious boss, Senator Roscoe Conkling.  But Arthur surprised everyone be becoming a champion of Civil Service Reform and honest government as President, cutting his ties to his corrupt former associates and signing the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act into law.


And according to Crow T. Robot's report on Rutherford B. Hayes, a founding member of ZZ Top.

http://www.mst3kinfo.com/ward_e/Bit510.html (http://www.mst3kinfo.com/ward_e/Bit510.html)


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on August 25, 2020, 08:57:53 AM
I guess these count.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51etNIE%2BsXL._AC_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51Tvm2JAZYL._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Neville on August 25, 2020, 09:06:53 AM
I started pilling Walter Mosley and James Lee Burke novels when the confinement starte, and I still have a few left.

Mosley writes these great detective novels starring black detective Easy Rawlings. They all take place after WWII in LA, and they have some great social commentary together with the misteries. Mosley has other series as well, but I'm sticking to this one until I read them all.

The first novel was made into a pretty good film, "Devil in a blue dress", starring Denzel.

As for James Lee Burke, I'm a fan of his Dave Robicheaux series. They follow the cases of a mature NOPD in Lousiana. The series is very long, and has some great titles as well as others that are just ho-hum. The best I can remember right now are "The Tin Roof Blowdown", which deals with Katrina and its aftermath, and its inmediate sequels. However, Burke is like 80 right now, and I think he should consider ending the series before they become a caricature.

And again, a couple of them have film versions: "Heaven's Prisoners", a sweaty, violent thriller starring Alec Baldwin, and "In the electric mist", starring Tommy Lee Jones. If you watch the latter, make sure to get the extended international cut rather than the American one.

My sis also asked me to recover a few of her old favorites from the attic, and I also found some vintage Jim Thompson and John Godey for me. As you see, I like crime novels.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: ER on August 27, 2020, 10:53:18 AM
I been re-re-re-rereading the four Messages From Michael books this summer. I used to be tangentially connected with CQY/Sarah Chambers' group (as opposed to the dozens of fake Michael groups---the ones that charge money and tell everyone they're old souls on a young soul planet) through a friend and after twenty years of being intrigued by the Michael material, it was soon disillusioningly like seeing the man behind the curtain, so reading the books now arises from a different perspective than I had in high school and later. It's still an intriguing system if approached as a way to stereotype personalities for fun, just one presented differently from the reality of how things truly are in the group, which is far different than the books.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on September 11, 2020, 08:42:46 AM
About to start this one:

(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/8cf63dc3-3048-443d-b0e4-11b867eb7935.03e43bdf5b0a17d9a6000b81d7be2934.jpeg?odnWidth=612&odnHeight=612&odnBg=ffffff)

Chapters on Abel Ferrara,Radley Metzger, Melvin van Peebles, Doris Wishman, biker films, Harmony Korine, Herschel Gordon Lewis, and others.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Alex on September 11, 2020, 08:59:35 AM
I guess these count.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51etNIE%2BsXL._AC_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51Tvm2JAZYL._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)


Keep meaning to ask if you've read all the OOtS stuff, or even played the boardgame Rev?


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on September 11, 2020, 10:07:21 AM
I guess these count.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51etNIE%2BsXL._AC_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51Tvm2JAZYL._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)


Keep meaning to ask if you've read all the OOtS stuff, or even played the boardgame Rev?

No, I gave not played the boardgame, but I have read all the comics.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Alex on September 11, 2020, 10:20:23 AM
The game is a bit too long to really work, so you aren't missing anything there. Glad I am not the only one here who reads it.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Sitting Duck on September 13, 2020, 08:13:06 AM
The hardcopy collections for Order of the Stick are nice, but the author notes frequently make him come across as pompous. And hoo boy does he ever have daddy issues. I suppose I could just not read the notes, but it's like a pile-up in that you can't not look. And occasionally there's an interesting tidbit.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Alex on September 13, 2020, 08:36:15 AM
I can't argue with you there. I like his comics, but I'm not sure I'd want to share a beer with him.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on September 13, 2020, 09:32:23 AM
The hardcopy collections for Order of the Stick are nice, but the author notes frequently make him come across as pompous. And hoo boy does he ever have daddy issues. I suppose I could just not read the notes, but it's like a pile-up in that you can't not look. And occasionally there's an interesting tidbit.

I actually really enjoy the insights into why he structures the story the way he does. I think they are aimed mainly at other writers.

I also started

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41igEPlirLL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Neville on September 13, 2020, 09:53:58 AM
I'm doing a break in my diet of crime novels and I'm now reading the Lapierre / Collins bestseller "Freedom at Midnight". It's a detailed account of the events that lead to the independence of India and the creation of Pakistan. It's very pro-British, reading it you'd never think GB did anything wrong by conquering India, but an absorbing read anyway. The portraits of Louis Mountbatten and Gandhi are very interesting, but also the accounts of the reasons why Hindu, Muslim and Sikh refused to share the same country after its liberation.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Dennis on September 14, 2020, 06:08:49 PM
I recently finished reading The Good Shepard By C. S. Forester, so when I saw the opening of the trailer for Greyhound I realized it's now a Tom Hanks movie. I'm hoping the film is as good as the book.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: ER on September 15, 2020, 09:01:56 AM
I've decided to spend the next year reading few to no new books, but going back and re-reading books I loved in the past.

On my list:

LOTR
The Little House books
The Voyage of the Beagle
Harry Potter
Night-Side, by Joyce Carol Oates
If You Could See Me Now, by Peter Straub
Creation, by Gore Vidal
This Side of Paradise, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Several Far Side Collections
The Little Stranger, by Sarah Waters
Cash: The Autobiography, by Johnny Cash
The Complete Stories of Flannery O'COnnor
Night Shift, by Stephen King
The Valley of Fear, by Arthur Conan Doyle
Lost in the Forest, by Sue Miller
A Song of Fire and Ice
The Memoirs of Julia Dent Grant

and if I make it that far I'll (be surprised) maybe throw in The Ruins, by Scott Smith.

All these books meant something to me at one point or another in my life, and while I guess it can be hazardous to memory to re-read old favorites in another era of life, it might also be a happy experience. I'll tell you guys how it goes.

Then I may spend a year after that reading books I always meant to get around to reading but never did. Books like:

The Reivers, by William Faulkner
Marvel 1602, by Neil Gaiman
The Tale of Genji, by Murasaki Shikibu
The Unaborted Socrates, by Peter Kreeft (a teacher gave this to me in high school and I've never opened it)
The Aeneid, by Virgil

 
(Heck that list could go on forever...)

Or, you know, maybe I won't. We'll see. Namaste.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: lester1/2jr on October 05, 2020, 09:40:58 PM
http://youtu.be/qw8HhTnot0w (http://youtu.be/qw8HhTnot0w)


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: BoyScoutKevin on October 07, 2020, 04:18:37 PM
I recently finished reading The Good Shepard By C. S. Forester, so when I saw the opening of the trailer for Greyhound I realized it's now a Tom Hanks movie. I'm hoping the film is as good as the book.

Haven't read the book. Haven't seen the film, so I can't say whether the film is as good as the book, but I have seen the trailer, and I'd say it certainly is something different for Hanks. One of those films that was suppose to get a theatrical release, but, because of the pandemic was shown on one of the streaming services.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: BoyScoutKevin on October 07, 2020, 04:39:13 PM
Ye-es!
6 of 1

Michael Stanley
(Michael Sears and Stanley Trollop. South African writing duo)
award winners
Shoot the bastards
1st in the Crystal Nguyen series
+ 7 more fiction in 1 more series
Heroine: Asian American
Places: Mozambique, South Africa, Switzerrland, U.S., Vietnam
Time: Present


Michael Stanley
(Michael Sears and Stanley Trollop. South African writing duo)
award winners
Facets of death
7th in the Detective Kubu series
+1 more fiction in 1 more series
Hero: Motswana
Place: Botswana
Time: 1990s


Kathleen Kent
American
The burn
2nd in the Detective Betty Rhyzyk series
Heroin: Polish American
Place: New York City and Dallas (Texas)
Time: 2010s with a flashback to the 1990s


Catherine Lloyd
ex-Pat Brit
Death comes to the nursery
7th in the Kurland St. Mary series
Heroine: Brit
Place: U.K.
Time: 1820s


Martin Limon
American
G.I. Confidential
14th in the Sueno and Bascom series
+1 short story collection
Heroes: Mexican American and Caucasian
Place: South Korea
Time: 1970s


Rebecca Roanhorse
Native American
award winner
Star Wars : Resistance Reborn
part of Journey to Star Wars : the Rise of Skywalker
prequel to the film


Danny Fingeroth
American
A Marvelous life :
the Amazing story of Stan Lee
6 more non-fiction

Next time: a half dozen more



Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: jimpickens on October 10, 2020, 05:07:55 AM
The Flesh Eaters by LA Morse.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on October 26, 2020, 07:44:13 AM
I'm rereading "Immoral Tales: European Sex & Horror Movies 1956–1984." Some of you have probably read it and if not, you probably should.

(https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQk_VVI0KCP_OPjPTlXGS6r6h0_D5bMKbj2wPW1fNqY7XNoI69w)


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: BoyScoutKevin on November 17, 2020, 04:02:50 PM
Well, now  that we have found you, here are a half dozen more that I have read.

Disney Princess Cross-Stitch :
22 easy to follow patterns featuring
Ariel, Belle. Jasmine, Mulan, and more . . .

and more . . .
Aurora, Cinderella, Merida, Pocahontas, Rapunzel, Snow White, and Tiana.


Jean Luc Banalee
ex-pat French or ex-pat German
The Killing Tide
translated by Peter Miller
5th in the Brittany mystery series
1st published in 2016
translation published in 2020
Hero: French
Place: Brittany (France)
Time: Present


Mike Isaac
American
award winner
Super pumped :
the battle for Uber


Eiily Griffiths
Brit
award winner
Now you see them
5th in the Magic men series
11 more fiction in 1 more series + 1 stand alone
Heroine: Brit
Place: U.K.
Time: 1960s


Cavan Scott
Brit
Star Wars :
Dooku : Jedi lost
10 more fiction in 3 more series


Martin Edwards
Brit
award winner
The measure of malice :
scientific detection stories
edited and introduced by Martin Edwards
14 stories published bteween 1891 and 1955 in which the detective uses scientific deduction to solve a crime.


Next time: 6 more







Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: jimpickens on November 23, 2020, 04:56:11 AM
A Coffin Full Of Dreams by Frisco Hitt.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: BoyScoutKevin on November 28, 2020, 04:41:57 PM
Ye-es!
6 more

1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die

Elly Griffiths
Brit
award winner
The Lantern Men
12th in the Ruth Galloway series + 5 more in 1 more series + 1 stand alone
Heroine: Brit
Place: U.K.
Time: Present with flashbacks to 2007


Alexander Freed
American
Star Wars : Shadow Fall
2nd in the Alphabet Squaeron trilogy
4 more fiction in the Star Wars series


Rae Carson
American
Star Wars : the Rise of Skywalker
expanded edition
novelization of the screenplay
2 more Star Wars + 8 more fiction in 2 more series


Timothy Zahn
American
award winner
Thrawn Ascendeency : Chaos Rising
1st in the 2nd Thrawn trilogy
14 more Star Wars

Whereas, the 1st trilogy took place between Solo and Rebels. This takes place in an earlier time between Atack of the Clones and Return of the Sith.


Star Wars : the Force Awakens
grphic novelization of the screenplay


Next time: something a little different. Only 1 or 2 at a time, but with more detail.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: BoyScoutKevin on December 03, 2020, 06:08:14 PM
Eric  Jay Dolin
American
award winner
 
A Furious Sky :
the Five Hundred Year History of America's hurricanes
8 more non-fictrion

While there have been individual books about individual hurricanes, this is one of the few that cover almost the entire history of hurricanes  from 1502 to 2019. Of the 46 hurricanes for which we have a death toll and/or are covered in some depth, we have a total death toll of 51,817 or 1126.5 per hurricane. Probably only earthquakes cause more loss of life per disaster than hurricanes. And that figure is probably an undercount, as in 1980 the way deaths from hurricanes was changed.

1502-1979 only people killed directly by the hurricane during the hurricane were counted, but, in . . .
1980-2019 people who died indirectly, or people who would not have died otherwise,  before or after the hurricane were counted as victims.

Hurricanes have not only had affects on meteorlogy, but also on . . .
the arts (including films) -- botany -- history -- literature (both fiction and non-fiction) -- politics -- and zoology . . .
according the the writer.

If there is one knock I have is that the writer does not cover Central America, which we know from this year, is part of the Americas and is threatened by hurricanes. The writer actually spends more time in the Pacific, which should be out of the scope of this book, then he does Central America.

Next time: A. J. Baines' Dewey Defeats Truman


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: BoyScoutKevin on December 11, 2020, 05:23:15 PM
The above is so wide ranging in its coverage of hurricanes in America, over the past 500 years, the following people have some connection with hurricanes and thus are associated with the subject.

John James Audubon
Dave Barry -- Clara Barton -- Mary McLeod Bethune -- David Brinkley
Christopher Columbus -- Walter Cronkite
Margery Stoneman Douglas -- Michael Eric Dyson
Colin Farrell -- Henry Morrison Flagler -- Benjamin Franklin
William F. "Bull" Halsey -- Alexander Hamilton -- Katherine Hepburn -- Ernest Hemingway -- Zora Neale Hurston
Thomas Jefferson -- Sebastian Junger
Dr. Juanita Kreps
Jean Lafitte
Samuel F. B. Morse -- Edward R. Murrow
Sam Neill
Dan Rather -- Franklin Delano Roosevelt -- John Ruskin
Stephen Spielberg
and Bernard Vonnegut (Kurt's elder brother)

and next time: A. J. Baines' Dewey Defeats Truman


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Neville on December 12, 2020, 08:21:36 AM
I'm reading the collected works of George Leigh Mallory, the English mountaneer who died while trying to reach the Everest summit in the 1920s. They are a bit arid, but things pick up when he chronicles his expeditions to the Everest and the difficulties he saw in reaching its top.

When I'm done it's hard boiled time again, either Mike Hammer ("Kiss me deadly") or Easy Rawlins ("Little scarlet"). Unless I find something that catches my eye at the local library.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: BoyScoutKevin on December 12, 2020, 03:40:16 PM
A. J. Baines
American
Dewey Defeats Truman : the 1948 Election and the Battle for America's Soul
4 more non-fiction

in which the writer points out at least a dozen haunting parallels between 1948 and 2020.
like no other that I have seen, he puts a face on the election.
while we have known the results for 72 years, he still manages to create some suspense.
and while there have been individual books about each of the individual candidates, treating them not as individuals, but, as an equal part of the whole makes, as in Aesop's fable, a stronger whole.
in the end, the best man won.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: BoyScoutKevin on December 16, 2020, 05:18:43 PM
A. J.. Baines' Dewey Defeats Truman

And thou shalt knoweth them by their supporters,

Wallace
aaron copland -- arthur miller -- charlie chaplin -- clifford odets -- edward g. robinson -- frank lloyd wright -- helen keller -- lillian hellman -- norman mailer -- paul robeson -- pete seeger -- studs terker -- thomas mann -- w.e.b. dubois

Truman
archibald macleish -- carson mccullers -- conrad aiken -- georgie jessel -- humphrey bogart -- lauren bacall -- perle "the hostess with the mostest" mesta -- ronald reagan -- sinclair lewis -- truman capote

Dewey
barbara stanwyck -- ginger rogers -- jeanette mcdonald -- john wayne -- lionel barrymore --  randolph scott -- walt disney

Thurmond
?


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: BoyScoutKevin on December 19, 2020, 03:47:06 PM
Harold Hober
American
award winner
The President vs. the PRess :
the Endless Battle between the White House and the Media --
from the Founding Fathers to Fake News.
39 more non-fiction.

To be continued . . .


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on December 23, 2020, 10:28:11 PM
TITAN: THE LIFE OF JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER by Ron Chernow

I knew a little bit about J.D. Rockefeller - one of the original robber barons, America's first billionaire, founder of Standard Oil, and philanthropist extraordinaire - but this rich, detailed biography provided a remarkable picture of a very complex man.  Absolutely ruthless in his business practices, and yet undeniably generous and kind-natured, Rockefeller is a study of everything that is wrong and right about capitalism, all in one package.  He built his empire by crushing or buying out all his competitors, but then gave away hundreds of millions of dollars to a variety of worthy causes before his death at the age of 98 in 1937.  Pioneering medical research, fighting infectious diseases, patronizing the arts, championing conservation - it is hard to imagine how any man of his generation could have done more good for a greater variety of causes.  But his use of monopoly to achieve dominance and his cut-throat business methods led to him being branded as a poster child for the evils of runaway corporatism.  In short, Rockefeller was both hero and villain, and defies all attempts to pigeonhole him into any particular stereotype.  Overall, an excellent read!  5/5


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on December 27, 2020, 10:16:32 AM
I'll be starting THE WEIRD AND THE EERIE by Mark Fisher tonight.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on December 29, 2020, 08:16:56 AM
RICHARD AND JOHN: KINGS AT WAR by Frank McLynn

   There is an ongoing trend in modern academia to tear down heroes and rehabilitate villains, and nowhere is this more evident in the way that many historians have written about the two sons of Henry II of England, Richard the Lionheart and John Softsword.  Richard, the famous crusader king, has been vilified as a brute homosexual thug, an inept diplomat, and an arrogant, corrupt warmonger; while John has been painted as a skilled diplomat, courageous warrior, and superb administrator.  McLynn goes back to the primary sources to see which version is true, and in so doing he eviscerates the sloppy scholarship and academic bias of Richard's detractors and John's admirers to arrive at a truth first proclaimed during these men's lives: that Richard was a brave warrior, an excellent diplomat, and a much-loved King; while John was a vile person and a failed monarch.  Well-written, thoroughly researched, and easy to follow despite its bulk, this book held up just as well in its second reading as it did the first time I read it several years back.  Definitely worthwhile for anyone who enjoys British history!


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Jim H on December 31, 2020, 12:35:06 AM
TITAN: THE LIFE OF JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER by Ron Chernow

I knew a little bit about J.D. Rockefeller - one of the original robber barons, America's first billionaire, founder of Standard Oil, and philanthropist extraordinaire - but this rich, detailed biography provided a remarkable picture of a very complex man.  Absolutely ruthless in his business practices, and yet undeniably generous and kind-natured, Rockefeller is a study of everything that is wrong and right about capitalism, all in one package.  He built his empire by crushing or buying out all his competitors, but then gave away hundreds of millions of dollars to a variety of worthy causes before his death at the age of 98 in 1937.  Pioneering medical research, fighting infectious diseases, patronizing the arts, championing conservation - it is hard to imagine how any man of his generation could have done more good for a greater variety of causes.  But his use of monopoly to achieve dominance and his cut-throat business methods led to him being branded as a poster child for the evils of runaway corporatism.  In short, Rockefeller was both hero and villain, and defies all attempts to pigeonhole him into any particular stereotype.  Overall, an excellent read!  5/5

I have a relative who worked directly for David Rockefeller in 30 Rock, so I was able to meet him and shake his hand (this would have been when he was in his early 80s).  He of course remembered his grandfather and could talk about him, as he died when he was in his early 20s - which is just fascinating to think about in terms of history and how close seemingly distant times really are.  I'll have to read this one, maybe I can follow it with David's memoirs which I started to read (the opening is about JD's death if memory serves, so it'd work as a followup) but didn't finish.  He signed it to me, so it's my own tiny connection to Rockefeller history.

That said..  I'm reading the Cloud Roads by Martha Wells, a VERY VERY different book.  Pure high fantasy.  If you like non-human protagonists, it's a pretty interesting one, worth a read.  I'm about a third through it.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: lester1/2jr on January 08, 2021, 11:54:58 PM
Standard Oil was THE great American company. Before they came in oil was found and taken out of the ground in haphazard ways. They revolutionized the industry. better methods and lower prices for consumers

I'm now reading Mary, the final in Sholem Asch's New testament trilogy for which he was banned from Israel, though that's where his archive is now. The first was the Nazarene which was the New Testament, then The Apostle which was the letters.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on January 18, 2021, 07:27:31 PM
PRESIDENT WITHOUT A PARTY: THE LIFE OF JOHN TYLER by Christopher J. Leahy

John Tyler holds a number of records as President: He was the first "accidental President," a Vice President who succeeded to the Presidency when his predecessor died (after only 31 days in office!); he fathered more children than any President (15 kids across two marriages); first to get married while in office (he was 53, she was 22!), and the ONLY President who sided with the Confederacy during the American Civil War.  Tyler's political philosophy  was heavily influenced by the Virginia and Kentucky resolutions of 1798; ultimately, he placed states' rights over the Federal government and was one of the guiding forces behind Virginia's decision to leave the Union.  He never understood or sympathized with the abolitionist movement, believing slavery a necessary evil that would fade with time.  This was a well-written biography of an interesting (if deeply flawed) man. 

BTW: Fun fact:  Although John Tyler was born in 1790, he had two grandchildren still alive when this book was published in 2019!


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on January 30, 2021, 12:04:51 PM
Started

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/51mu6IYmy8L.jpg)

It's being made into a movie and for once I'm going to read the novel first. (That's usually a bad idea, I find, because you imagine the characters looking certain ways... then they don't.)


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on January 30, 2021, 12:08:37 PM
OLD BONES by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child

  This is a spinoff series from the wildly popular "Agent Pendergast" novels that these two have been writing since the 1990's.  Two of Pendergast's more memorable associates, Corrie Swanson - now a newly minted FBI agent - and Nora Kelly, forensic anthropologist, team up investigating a long-lost campsite where part of the infamous Donner Party perished in 1847 amid horrifying scenes of madness and cannibalism.  But someone is trying to recover the remains of one of these long-dead cannibals, and is willing to kill to get his hands on them.  A nice, satisfying thriller!


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pacman000 on January 31, 2021, 09:42:02 PM
Exile’s Quest by Richard Meade


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on April 17, 2021, 10:22:21 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91DQtpxjW-L.jpg)

Sort of a girly, intellectual book about a woman helping a friend who's dying of cancer. Picked it up on a whim but I admit I'm enjoying it despite the fact that it's not in my usual wheelhouse.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on April 17, 2021, 12:54:42 PM
THE YEARS OF LYNDON JOHNSON: THE PATH TO POWER by Robert A. Caro
I have had this book for at least 20 years - I think I may have even inherited it from my Dad; honestly, I'm not sure where I got it - but I had never read it until this month.  What a BRILLIANT biography!  Of course, it covers only the first 32 years of Lyndon Johnson's colorful life, but Caro went to many living sources to compile this story, and it is a compelling view of a cunning, ambitious, brilliant, and altogether ruthless young man whose only abiding principle seemed to be the pursuit of power.   Johnson is show as a calculating, amoral young man who would attach himself like a barnacle to anyone who could advance his career and jettison them the moment he found someone who could help him more effectively.  Yet, at the same time, he was incredibly hardworking, and got more done for folks in his district and out of it than any member of Congress.  I'm very excited about continuing the series, the second book is sitting on my dining table right now and I will be ordering the other two when I finish it. 5/5 - this book is what biographies should be!


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Jim H on April 19, 2021, 10:54:38 AM
I'm reading the First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie.  Piling through them really, for me.  I read the first two books over about a month, and am a third of the way through the third.

If you've ever read a fantasy trilogy and thought wow, this is really overly dense and verbose I wish it was half as long, you'd like this series.  It's a dark medieval fantasy, brutally violent and harsh, and VERY fast moving.  It also has some of the most compelling characters around.  Like one of the POV leads is Glokta, a former "heroic soldier" ideal type who was brutally mutilated and tortured after getting his platoon killed, and now is an imperial "interrogator" himself.  Or Logen Ninefingers, who is basically a barbarian who has burned out on killing people, but still has to keep doing it anyway. 

Yet it goes in a bit different directions than you might expect.  An underlying current that's interesting - most of the POV leads are, at best, drawn in shades of grey, yet they have a small but (at times unfortunately) undercurrent of kindness running through them that occasionally peaks out in unexpected ways, and sometimes sends the story going in a direction you wouldn't guess.

Very much recommended. 


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on April 20, 2021, 06:02:35 PM
THE CASE FOR JESUS by Brant Pitre

This is a short but very readable book that takes some of the most popular arguments against the accuracy of the New Testament and refutes them one by one. Pitre addresses ideas popularized by recent skeptics like Bart Ehrman using hard data and solid analysis.  Among the topics he takes on:

Were the Gospels anonymously written and then attributed to the traditional authors to give them greater credibility?
Were the Gospels written too late to contain eyewitness testimony?
Were the stories in the Gospels exaggerated and significantly altered between the time they happened and the time they were written down?
Did Jesus truly claim to be God?

I've read a number of books on both sides of the argument, and this is one of the best and most succinct I have read in defending the traditional claims of the NT.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on May 05, 2021, 07:51:06 AM
Just put

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_GbjayVrAL5Kb4x6YZSwECjphtqqfSKiw5gSi6aJXPLoulBGk2KHBMQ4XxivErUubR5ThlbLMUK7vUJLklFP7DiYuSct1PHFIVCiFyAgdSU6krnFxTfpkByaJdq_2nM5I9Xoe2hywgA=s412)

in the bathroom.



Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Sitting Duck on May 06, 2021, 07:59:02 AM
Just put

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_GbjayVrAL5Kb4x6YZSwECjphtqqfSKiw5gSi6aJXPLoulBGk2KHBMQ4XxivErUubR5ThlbLMUK7vUJLklFP7DiYuSct1PHFIVCiFyAgdSU6krnFxTfpkByaJdq_2nM5I9Xoe2hywgA=s412)

in the bathroom.

Loved the story of their difficulties in finding a copy of That Hagen Girl.

Got the first five books of The Expanse series for my birthday and am currently hallway through Caliban's War. It's sooooo much better than the TV series, to the point that I think I'll pass on the sixth season when Amazon puts it up.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on May 09, 2021, 07:14:02 PM
well i'm now reading Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King (2014) i had read #196 pages  of it and than i just didn't feel like reading anymore and it wasn't cause i thought the book was bad either. i picked it back up late Friday night Early Saturday Morning and now i've read over 40 pages! i'm on page #244 thus far anyways and i hope to finish it this time


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on May 14, 2021, 01:31:36 AM
well i finished it yesterday and i liked it but it's not gonna be among my favorites and it honestly didn't feel like a King novel either and that's not a bad thing either.

it's not anything against the novel is what i'm saying  i'd say 8/10.     now i'm reading the Killer's Wedge by Ed McBain (1959)  the i think 7th or 8th 87th Precinct novel i forget which


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: FatFreddysCat on May 14, 2021, 09:59:55 AM
Rocks: My Life In and Out of Aerosmith, by Joe Perry with David Ritz


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on May 15, 2021, 02:42:27 AM
honestly i had no idea Joe Perry even wrote a book to be honest


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on May 19, 2021, 02:52:41 AM
well i finished that book that was the 8th by the way & now i'm reading the 9th called Till Death and this one i've read a few times through the years and i think it's one of the best ones but i haven't read it in years though so i actually do not  remember anything about it


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on May 31, 2021, 10:31:56 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61a-pJx0IOL.jpg)

Not going to be easy reading, but it's been sitting in my "to get to" pile forever and it's time to do it!


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on June 02, 2021, 12:05:18 AM
i finished 2 books 1. Death Du Juror (1999) by Kathy Reighs which i think i spelled wrong? i never can seem to spell it right i guess lol. but she created the character Bones from the same show though in the book she's not called that and the book i read was the 2nd book in her Temperance Brennan book series.

i love the show but when i started the 1st book a couple years back and read that i knew it was gonna be completely different and it is and that's not a bad thing either, well that was yesterday morning i finished that and this morning i finished another one  Unnatural Exposure (1997( by Patrica Cornwell i started this sucker which is book #8 in her Scarpetta series than at some point i just didn't feel like reading anymore and it wasn't cause the book was bad either.

i get that way sometimes for some strange reason anyways, it only had like i think 74 pages left and i finished that last night in fact and both books were pretty good actually.

now i'm reading Patrica Cornwell's 9th book Point of Origin (1998)  this one i haven't read yet i'm only on like page 6 i think? on how long i've had this damn book i bought it in like (1999) when the paperback came out so it took me over 20 years to finally get around to actually reading it! anyone take that long to read a book they bought or was given years ago?


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: teenagehonvedfan on June 06, 2021, 05:21:19 AM
East of West by Jonathan Hickman. Cyberpunk western with the four horsemen and a very different America. It's pretty interesting so far.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on June 10, 2021, 02:16:21 AM
i'm currently reading 2 books actually i read whatever the hell i'm in the mood for that's just the way i roll i guess. i've always been that way so the one i'm reading tonight it's the 10th book in the Kay Scarpetta series Black Notice (1999) by Patrica Cornwell  & the other is book #3 Deadly Decisions by Kathy Reichs (2000)

one i'm only on chapter 5 in Black Notice and i think Chapter maybe 3 in Deadly decisions i forget


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Trevor on July 05, 2021, 01:55:01 AM
Oliver Stone's CHASING THE LIGHT: a really good book about his life and attempts to break into Hollywood.

https://www.amazon.com/Chasing-Light-Directing-Surviving-Midnight/dp/0358346231 (https://www.amazon.com/Chasing-Light-Directing-Surviving-Midnight/dp/0358346231)

I know some people don't like him but I actually do and I never knew he had a sense of humor (a good one too).


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on July 05, 2021, 04:00:14 AM
well i did finish Black notice (1999) but i haven't finished Deadly Decisions that for now is put aside.  i did finish one book though Centatur Aisle (1981) by Piers Anthony Book #4 in the Xanth series at the moment i dunno if i'm gonna finish it or not but i'm currently reading book #5 Ogre,Ogre (1982) again by Piers Anthony this one is one of my favorite books in the long extremely long Xanth Series.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Trevor on July 05, 2021, 01:06:53 PM
Just put

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_GbjayVrAL5Kb4x6YZSwECjphtqqfSKiw5gSi6aJXPLoulBGk2KHBMQ4XxivErUubR5ThlbLMUK7vUJLklFP7DiYuSct1PHFIVCiFyAgdSU6krnFxTfpkByaJdq_2nM5I9Xoe2hywgA=s412)

in the bathroom.



Rev, do you know why that pic from The Omen is on there?


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on July 05, 2021, 04:39:52 PM
Just put

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_GbjayVrAL5Kb4x6YZSwECjphtqqfSKiw5gSi6aJXPLoulBGk2KHBMQ4XxivErUubR5ThlbLMUK7vUJLklFP7DiYuSct1PHFIVCiFyAgdSU6krnFxTfpkByaJdq_2nM5I9Xoe2hywgA=s412)

in the bathroom.



Rev, do you know why that pic from The Omen is on there?

It's not his worst pick for Fifty Worst Films of All Time. He also picked "Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia," "Ivan the Terrible," and "Last Year in Marienbad."


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Sitting Duck on July 05, 2021, 08:34:31 PM
Just put

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_GbjayVrAL5Kb4x6YZSwECjphtqqfSKiw5gSi6aJXPLoulBGk2KHBMQ4XxivErUubR5ThlbLMUK7vUJLklFP7DiYuSct1PHFIVCiFyAgdSU6krnFxTfpkByaJdq_2nM5I9Xoe2hywgA=s412)

in the bathroom.

Rev, do you know why that pic from The Omen is on there?

You need to remember that, at the time it was released, most critics hated The Omen. Also, screenwriter David Seltzer wasn't especially proud of it. He is quoted to the effect that, while it was nice not having to worry about paying for groceries, he wished it happened with something he personally found more meaningful.

There are also five MST3K movies featured in it. They are Eegah, The Horror of Party Beach, Robot Monster, Santa Claus Conquers the Martians, and Swamp Diamonds (under the title Swamp Women).


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: FatFreddysCat on July 05, 2021, 09:27:20 PM
I've been on a big comics/graphic novels kick of late thanks to my local library.

Just finished: The Rocketeer: The Complete Adventures by Dave Stevens

Currently reading:
Spider-Man Noir: The Complete Collection by David Hine, Roger Stern et. al.
...a cool "alternate timeline" Spidey collection set in the crime-ridden New York of the early 1930s. It's really quite clever how they managed to transplant Spidey and all of his supporting cast (Aunt May, J. Jonah Jameson, Norman Osborn, the Black Cat, etc.) into a totally different era and tweaked their back stories just enough to make it feel true to the time period. Neat stuff.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on July 05, 2021, 10:27:47 PM
of that batch the only one to watch i think are Swamp women (1955) that one i think is a pretty good one at least when first watched it years ago and this wasn't the MSTK3000 version at that time i had no idea they even did that film at all or i had forgotten but i enjoyed it.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Trevor on July 07, 2021, 04:59:29 AM
Just put

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_GbjayVrAL5Kb4x6YZSwECjphtqqfSKiw5gSi6aJXPLoulBGk2KHBMQ4XxivErUubR5ThlbLMUK7vUJLklFP7DiYuSct1PHFIVCiFyAgdSU6krnFxTfpkByaJdq_2nM5I9Xoe2hywgA=s412)

in the bathroom.



Rev, do you know why that pic from The Omen is on there?

It's not his worst pick for Fifty Worst Films of All Time. He also picked "Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia," "Ivan the Terrible," and "Last Year in Marienbad."

 :buggedout:

Wow, those are all pretty good films IMO.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Trevor on July 07, 2021, 05:01:15 AM
Just put

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_GbjayVrAL5Kb4x6YZSwECjphtqqfSKiw5gSi6aJXPLoulBGk2KHBMQ4XxivErUubR5ThlbLMUK7vUJLklFP7DiYuSct1PHFIVCiFyAgdSU6krnFxTfpkByaJdq_2nM5I9Xoe2hywgA=s412)

in the bathroom.

Rev, do you know why that pic from The Omen is on there?

You need to remember that, at the time it was released, most critics hated The Omen. Also, screenwriter David Seltzer wasn't especially proud of it. He is quoted to the effect that, while it was nice not having to worry about paying for groceries, he wished it happened with something he personally found more meaningful.

There are also five MST3K movies featured in it. They are Eegah, The Horror of Party Beach, Robot Monster, Santa Claus Conquers the Martians, and Swamp Diamonds (under the title Swamp Women).

Thanks: I didn't know that. The Omen was also banned in South Africa for a while.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on July 07, 2021, 07:50:44 AM
Just put

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_GbjayVrAL5Kb4x6YZSwECjphtqqfSKiw5gSi6aJXPLoulBGk2KHBMQ4XxivErUubR5ThlbLMUK7vUJLklFP7DiYuSct1PHFIVCiFyAgdSU6krnFxTfpkByaJdq_2nM5I9Xoe2hywgA=s412)

in the bathroom.




Rev, do you know why that pic from The Omen is on there?

It's not his worst pick for Fifty Worst Films of All Time. He also picked "Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia," "Ivan the Terrible," and "Last Year in Marienbad."

 :buggedout:

Wow, those are all pretty good films IMO.


One thing I think he did is just feature the worst movie from major directors: Hitchcock also gets in for "Jamaica Inn." It's really not a very good (bad) list. But it was the first of its kind. And the writing is snarky.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Trevor on July 07, 2021, 12:06:09 PM
Just put

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_GbjayVrAL5Kb4x6YZSwECjphtqqfSKiw5gSi6aJXPLoulBGk2KHBMQ4XxivErUubR5ThlbLMUK7vUJLklFP7DiYuSct1PHFIVCiFyAgdSU6krnFxTfpkByaJdq_2nM5I9Xoe2hywgA=s412)

in the bathroom.




Rev, do you know why that pic from The Omen is on there?

It's not his worst pick for Fifty Worst Films of All Time. He also picked "Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia," "Ivan the Terrible," and "Last Year in Marienbad."

 :buggedout:

Wow, those are all pretty good films IMO.


One thing I think he did is just feature the worst movie from major directors: Hitchcock also gets in for "Jamaica Inn." It's really not a very good (bad) list. But it was the first of its kind. And the writing is snarky.

Ah, OK, I see.  :thumbup: He wrote another book about bad movies and he made mention of Inchon! (1982) and the lack of good food available in South Korea at the time, talking about the food staples of kimchi and barbecued dog, which he called "shish-ke-puppy"  :tongueout: :tongueout:


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Sitting Duck on July 08, 2021, 07:37:33 PM
He wrote another book about bad movies and he made mention of Inchon! (1982) and the lack of good food available in South Korea at the time, talking about the food staples of kimchi and barbecued dog, which he called "shish-ke-puppy"  :tongueout: :tongueout:

That one is The Hollywood Hall of Shame. It concerns movies that ended up with bloated budgets and weak box office performance. The authors acknowledge that not all of the movies they cover in it are bad (though the vast majority are).


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on July 08, 2021, 08:12:52 PM
i'm reading Ogre,Orgre Xanth #5 (1982) by Piers Anthony i'm about #120 pages or so into it


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on July 08, 2021, 10:49:12 PM
HITLER: ASCENT 1889-1939 by Volker Ullrich

The first volume of a two part biography of the 20th century's most infamous dictator contains some remarkable insights into Hitler's life and character.  A compelling read from start to finish!


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on July 13, 2021, 03:31:22 PM
I just finished reading Nancy Spannaus' book, HAMILTON VERSUS WALL STREET, and posted this review on Amazon:

Alexander Hamilton was an economic genius - friends and foes alike were dizzied by his understanding of all things related to finance and banking.  I, on the other hand, am emphatically NOT gifted in that way - I understand supply and demand, and the basic principles of mercantilism, but when you start juggling Keynes against Adam Smith and talking about interest rates, sinking funds, etc, etc, I get lost pretty quickly.
   "Well, then, Mister Author," you might say, "How do you KNOW Hamilton was an economic genius and not just a con man with a big vocabulary?"
    It's really very simple - Hamilton's ideas WORKED.  When Hamilton took office as the first Treasury Secretary, the USA was some $55 million in debt, with another $22 million in foreign debt owed by individual states.  The government had no stable source of income with which to meet its financial obligations, and Europe had effectively "cut up our credit cards."  But Hamilton's four-point plan - funding the debt at full value, assuming the foreign debt of the states, a series of excise taxes to establish a revenue stream, and a national bank to handle the nation's debts - were so effective that within a few short years American notes would carry in any bank in the world.  His "Report on Manufactures" encouraged the government to protect American industries and fund "internal improvements" - what we would call infrastructure today.  Hamilton's ideas launched America's national economy and placed it on a firm footing that survived his death, and his enemies' attempts to dismantle the systems he created.
   What Spannaus argues in HAMILTON VERSUS WALL STREET is that throughout American history, the country has experienced real substantive economic growth when it has followed Hamilton's ideas, and has suffered economically when it has abandoned them.  Far from being the "Father of Wall Street," as he is often hailed, she claims that Hamilton's plans were opposed to the predatory, profit-driven banking systems of today, while favoring a carefully controlled, growth-driven lending system that would expand prosperity for all citizens instead of lining the pockets of the rich while leaving Main Street USA to rot.  She also points out that many other nations have employed, and benefited from, Hamiltonian economic systems in the 217 years since Hamilton's life was cut short by Aaron Burr's pistol.  Lastly, Spannaus argues that a re-created Bank of the United States, dedicated to promoting economic growth and rebuilt infrastructure, would be a boon to the country today, lifting large segments of the population from poverty to prosperity, and rebuilding our crumbling national infrastructure.  Short, well-written, and easy to follow, Nancy Spannaus' book is a fascinating look at how the ideas of Alexander Hamilton are still applicable and beneficial today, even as they were in his own time.  An excellent read!

Lewis B. Smith, author of PRESIDENT HAMILTON: A NOVEL OF ALTERNATIVE HISTORY


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on July 13, 2021, 07:16:07 PM
well i finished Ogre, Ogre (1982) by Piers Anthony Book #5 in the Xanth Series and it's like the 3rd time i've read it and it's one of my favorites so of course i'm gonna give in a good rating.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: jimpickens on July 20, 2021, 02:27:22 AM
The Chemistry of Powder & Explosives


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on July 20, 2021, 08:42:37 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41Y7K5pNdXL._SY291_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_FMwebp_.jpg)

Jean Cocteau, "The Art of Cinema"


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on August 12, 2021, 05:02:59 PM
THE LAST ORACLE by James Rollins -

    Rollins' books are fun for anyone who likes adventure stories with a strong background in history, archeology, and legend.  His Sigma Force is a secret branch of the US Government that deals with threats all over the world.  This fast-paced story begins when a homeless man is gunned down, literally falling into the arms of Sigma's director Painter Crowe on the National Mall in Washington.  As he dies, he passes an ancient Greek coin with an odd inscription to Crowe, triggering an adventure that leaps from India's Taj Mahal to Chernobyl to the most polluted lake in Russia, with ties to the ancient oracle at Delphi, the origin of the Gypsies, and possibly ending in the destruction of humanity!   A fun read that was hard to put down.   4/5


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on August 12, 2021, 05:07:54 PM
wow i hadn't updated on what i read since Ogre, Ogre, i read 1st To Die by James Patterson (2001), 2nd Chance also by James Patterson (2002)  and now i'm reading 3rd Degree also by James Patterson (2004)

when i read a book i dunno about anyone else but sometimes the book can stay in my mind for awhile before i move on to something else and if it's a series those characters can be in my head for awhile and if they still are i just read another one in the Series. 1st To Die (2001) i had read before i want to say at least 2 times before but not in years. the 1st time was when it first came out in (2001) but i had started 2nd Chance (2002)  a few times but i never did finish it until a few days ago i started it over but i've never read any of the others as i prefer to read them in order


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on August 19, 2021, 09:15:04 PM
I ALONE CAN FIX IT: DONALD J. TRUMP'S CATASTROPHIC FINAL YEAR by Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker

  A powerful, well-researched, enthralling, and horrifying look inside the Trump White House, spanning from January 2020 to February 2021.  Based on hundreds of hours of interviews with White House staff, cabinet members, congressmen, senators, and Trump himself, two journalists outline the President's horrifically incompetent response to the COVID pandemic, his casual cruelty, and above all the psychotic self-centeredness of a leader utterly devoid of compassion and decency, a man who had to be repeatedly dissuaded from using the U.S. military against our own citizens, whose utter divorce from reality lead him to a brazen attempt to overthrow the U.S. government rather than admit the American people had rejected him.  I've been appalled by Donald Trump for decades, horrified by the thought that such a man could be elected to the nation's highest office, and puzzled as to why a third of the country still worships him when he should be rotting in jail for sedition.  Nothing in this book changed my mind - but sadly, it won't change theirs either.  Still, this one is a compelling read regardless of where you stand on the former President.  5/5


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on August 19, 2021, 11:09:00 PM
i just can't read a book about him all it does it just anger me cause of all the crap he did and how many deaths he caused for not doing a damn thing.

anyways on a whim i dunno if this happens to anyone but i was trying  to write a poem  and trying to think of some ideas when all it a sudden it hit me to watch a Harry Potter movie i think that's one of those series you love it or hate it but than you can say that about a lot of book series or hell film series.

anyways, so it being at the time too late to watch any of the films i picked up the last book Deathly Hallows (2007)  i've been reading the series since around early (2000) i think? i don't think the 1st film had even started filming at that time cause it was filmed that year but Goblet of Fire (2000) wasn't out yet and it wasn't even out yet so the newest one was Prisoner of Azkaban  (1999)  i know it's spelled wrong but i'm to damn lazy to look it up lol.

anyways in short i've been reading it since i was 21.   it was more really on a Lark i forget why i started he he anyways, i was almost #300  pages into it as it was and so i picked it up and i've been reading that ever since. i've still got over #400 pages to go i'm on page #350 i think? 

so it was quite easy to get back into the book all i needed to do was just start a chapter over that's all.

anyways, i was today and bought Blockade Billy  (2021)   it just came out and is Stephen King's new one in fact it just came out on i think the 3rd?  i may read that one i dunno just yet


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Neville on August 20, 2021, 05:49:20 AM
The problem I see with a current book about Trump is that next week we will get some new revelation by a former staff member that should be on the book. The definitive book on Trump has still to be written.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on September 05, 2021, 07:40:04 PM
"A Hedonist Manifesto" by Michel Onfray. Not that I need any convincing.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Neville on September 06, 2021, 05:36:03 AM
I'm reading a book called "Spillover" by David Quammen. It chronicles centuries of investigations about outbreaks such as Ebola, Lyme's disease and many others. Don't look for morbid descriptions of the infected here, but it is a very interesting read, especially in these times.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on September 06, 2021, 09:55:09 PM
THE YEARS OF LYNDON JOHNSON: MEANS OF ASCENT by Robert Caro

This second volume of Caro's authoritative LBJ bio focuses on Johnson's years in Congress from 1941-48, especially on his turbulent campaign for the Democratic nomination for Texas' U.S. Senate seat in 1948, which culminated in LBJ winning by 87 votes turned in 6 days after the election was over from a single precinct in South Texas.  The flagrant theft of the nomination was aided and abetted by a Federal judge, who stopped an investigation on the literal day that the ballot box was to be open and the contested votes examined.  Johnson is on display in all his flawed glory in this book: His bravery during his one WW2 combat mission negated by his shameless lying about it afterwards, his utter lack of accomplishment as a member of Congress during the war, his willingness to be all things to all men in order to win, and his complete amorality in the pursuit of power.  Halfway through this massive undertaking, I will simply say this:  Caro's account of Johnson's life is one of the finest biographies I have ever read, period!


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on September 18, 2021, 02:40:23 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71kbRckbYJL.jpg)

New bathroom reading.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Alex on September 18, 2021, 02:49:11 PM
Finished Darkwalker On Moonshae which might be the best 'Dungeons & Dragons' story I've read (admittedly a lot of them I thought were quite poor).


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Neville on September 18, 2021, 02:52:32 PM
I'm reading "Broken" by Don Winslow. It's a collection of short stories starring characters from his previous works. So you get to see again the characters from "Bobby Z" or "Savages" among others. The stories themselves are OK, they don't have the scope of his longer novels, but they're fun to read.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on November 01, 2021, 06:26:58 PM
The Years of Lyndon Johnson: MASTER OF THE SENATE by Robert Caro

I read a LOT of biographies, but I will say that Robert Caro's magisterial series on LBJ is some of the finest biographical writing ever done.  Rich in detail and setting, Caro not only explains the complicated life and mixed record of Lyndon Johnson in lively and compelling detail, he also weaves in powerful portraits of the men who helped LBJ in his rise to power - Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, Georgia Senator Richard Russell, and passionate liberal Hubert Humphrey, along with Presidents Harry Truman and Dwight Eisenhower, are all painted in bold and vibrant strokes.  Johnson, having stolen won the Texas democratic primary for Senate by 89 votes, finds in the Senate a place where he can put all his skills to use, and in record time he bypasses the rules of seniority that govern that tradition-heavy body to become Majority Leader - not only that, but to become the most powerful Majority Leader in history.  Despite standing with the "Solid South" in opposition to any and all civil rights legislation, he still managed, in 1958, to push the first civil rights bill into law in 75 years.  It was a weak law, to be sure, but it still broke the South's perfect record on blocking civil rights legislation and set the stage for the huge reforms of his Presidency. Indeed, it becomes clear as one follows Caro's narrative that Johnson's whole life was lived in ruthless pursuit of one goal - the Presidency.  "Power corrupts," the old sayin goes, but Caro makes it clear that power also reveals - how one uses power shows where one's heart is.  Johnson is a very complicated person, vile in many ways and admirable in others, and Caro paints him, warts and all, in one of the greatest biographies ever penned.  I've already jumped into the next volume, THE PASSAGE OF POWER.  Highly recommended, 5/5.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Sitting Duck on November 02, 2021, 07:33:55 AM
"Power corrupts," the old sayin goes

I lean more towards Frank Herbert's update of that chestnut, in it's more that power attracts the easily corrupted.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: lester1/2jr on November 03, 2021, 02:12:06 PM
^agree with that. Also, ever notice how people overlook the "power corrupts" in favor of "absolute power..."?   people like to think a little bit of power is safe

I'm reading "What Paul Meant"

It's an analysis of the letters of Paul in the New Testament and tries to dispel some of what the author feels are myths about the famous apostle.

His main focus so far is to contrast the book of Acts with Paul himself and point out the differences. I hadn't really thought about it before, but it doesn't make tons of sense that while the Romans were the ones who had to put people to death because the pharisees didn't have that power, Saul was authorized not only to persecute Christians in Jerusalem but also somehow given authority to go to Syria and persecute those people.

In general the author prefers the letters to Luke/ acts


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on December 02, 2021, 10:20:06 AM
(https://prodimage.images-bn.com/pimages/9781609457693_p0_v2_s550x406.jpg)

Netflix sent me this paperback as a promotion for the movie adaptation they made. It's short and I'm probably going to see the film, so I'm giving it a whirl.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Alex on December 02, 2021, 10:40:55 AM
SAS: Band of brothers.

A true story of the capture of an SAS team inserted into occupied France to sabotage German defences and transport networks. They are tortured and eventually sent for execution on the direct orders of Hitler, but some of the team managed to survive and escape. The story then moves onto the hunt for the killers in the last days of WW2 and shortly after its end. It is one of a series of books on SAS/SOE operations and is a decent read, although not a completely riviting one so I am not sure if it would hold the attention of anyone who doesn't study the war.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on December 13, 2021, 11:22:40 PM
I just finished reading VALLEY FORGE, a wonderful narrative of the Continental Army's darkest winter.  Here is the review I just left for it on Amazon.  Definitely worth adding to the library of any American Revolution historian:

"For those of us who grew up in the 70's, Valley Forge was synonymous with the suffering and dedication of the Continental Army during the darkest days of the Revolution - the images of barefoot, barely clad soldiers huddling in the snow, wasting away on a diet of firecake and water, as George Washington rode alone to a clearing and bowed before the Almighty, pleading with God to deliver his troops from the privations they were enduring - it was powerful stuff!  But how much of it was true?
   VALLEY FORGE is a powerful narrative, as well researched as a scholarly dissertation but as smoothly narrated as a brilliant novel, which shows that the truth about this dark winter of the Revolution not only encompassed but surpassed the clichés.  I have read many books about the American Revolution, but this was one of my favorites.  The familiar characters from our textbooks - the passionate, determined, dominating figure of George Washington, the young, idealistic aristocrat John Laurens, the ambitious and always competent Alexander Hamilton, the arrogant, scheming Horatio Gates, and the fiery Frenchman with an American soul, Marquis de Lafayette, all spring from the pages and into our minds in full glory.
   This is a must for anyone who collects stories of the Revolutionary War, and will take its place alongside such classics as 1776 and FOUNDING BROTHERS in the histories of this era.  Well done, sirs!

Lewis Ben Smith, author of PRESIDENT HAMILTON: A NOVEL OF ALTERNATIVE HISTORY"


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Trevor on December 18, 2021, 01:55:25 PM
I bought Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Book 1: a color combined edition of several TMNT comics. Not bad as I've never read any of the comics, ever until now.  :smile:

https://www.amazon.com/Teenage-Mutant-Ninja-Turtles-I/dp/0915419092 (https://www.amazon.com/Teenage-Mutant-Ninja-Turtles-I/dp/0915419092)


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: jimpickens on January 16, 2022, 04:27:03 AM
Atrocity Week by Andrew McCoy not for the easily offended.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on January 18, 2022, 12:59:55 PM
(https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/9780316436601.jpg?fit=450%2C675)


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: ER on February 05, 2022, 10:39:20 PM
When I was with my friend the other day she gave me a novel called Daisy Jones and the Six about a fictional 1970s band, and said she'd just finished it, it was awesome and they were going to make a movie out of it, that it was Reese Witherspoon's absolutely favorite book of the century. She said I'd love it because it's set in the recent past and has a modern music/faux oral history vibe to it, and I do like reading oral histories.

I haven't finished it, maybe it picks up, but so far at the mid-point I gotta say this is one of the driest, flattest most uninspiring, most predictable, story-by-the-numbers books I've read in a while. It is like the author had a checklist she ticked off. Drugs, check, rehab, check, groupies, check, a Rolling Stone reporter following the group around, check, paternal manager who takes care of everyone, check, jealous wife, check, denim clothes, check, affairs within the band, check, ego-clashes between the singer and the band, check, angst about rock versus pop/rock versus disco, check. And somewhere in there there's no room left for any semblance of plot.

It's been a disappointment because it did sound promising.



Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on February 21, 2022, 10:42:20 AM
(https://pictures.abebooks.com/isbn/9780399504334-us.jpg)


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Neville on February 21, 2022, 12:09:38 PM
I picked "Indian Creek Chronicles: A Winter Alone in the Wilderness" by Pete Fromm in my local library. I've found travel books are a good break between my usual binges of crime novels.

The book is an account of a winter the author spent living in a tent in Idaho, while supervising a federal progream to reintroduce salmons into the wild. It's what you may expect of it, a light but insightful narration of his day to day and how he dealt with the problems he faced because of his own inexperience living in the wilderness.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on March 03, 2022, 10:13:07 AM
(https://pictures.abebooks.com/isbn/9781948742702-us.jpg)


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: FatFreddysCat on March 03, 2022, 11:14:06 AM
Hit Men: Power Brokers and Fast Money Inside the Music Business, by Fredric Dannen

The New Teen Titans Vol. 1 by Marv Wolfman, George Perez, and Romeo Tanghal


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on March 24, 2022, 09:31:33 PM
GUNS, GERMS, AND STEEL: THE FATES OF HUMAN SOCIETIES by Jared Diamond

Why did Europeans develop firearms, trans-Atlantic sailing vessels, and immunity (or at least healthy resistance) to deadly pandemic diseases like smallpox?
Why did the Chinese, who led the world in dozens of technologies between 1000-1400 AD, abandon many of those technologies in the next two centuries?
Why didn't native Americans develop simple technologies, like the wheel, or writing?
Why do some societies nurture invention and science, while others do not?

For centuries, the temptation has been to answer these questions by asserting that one race/tribe/nation is genetically or morally or intellectually superior to another. Jared Diamond argues that the real answer is determined by environmental issues, including the fertility of the soil, the presence of crops that can be cultivated and harvested to provide a constant, abundant supply of food, and the presence of large, domesticable animals that can supply both nutrition and "horse-power" to increase and multiply food production.

A bit dry in places, but impeccably well-researched, Diamond's book explores the reasons why some cultures flourish and develop, while others stagnate.  It provides a great deal of food for thought throughout, and I highly recommend it to any student of history!


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on March 29, 2022, 09:00:01 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91rN6YpCwcL.jpg)


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: ER on March 31, 2022, 06:47:50 PM
I've read scores of books about Medieval history, maybe even hundreds of books, it is the one period in human history that interests me above all others, but the most detestable, the most biased, the most agenda-driven book on the subject I've ever been exposed to is one that came out late last year called The Bright Ages, by David M. Perry.

It was bad history, bad reading, bad scholarship, and bad use of paper, ink, bandwidth, and time. Not only that but the writer is p***y-whipped by the university industrial complex's feminist mafia like no author I've ever read.

I think this is the worst book I have ever hated this much and still finished out of dogged masochistic loathing, and if I died tomorrow I would skip past Purgatory and ascend straight to Heaven, as all my sins are surely atoned for through the suffering that entered my assaulted eyes.

If ever there is a Geneva Convention for readers' rights, this book will be classified alongside mustard gas.

I'm going to start sniffing modeling glue to destroy the brain cells that remember encountering this loathsome war crime of a book.

Frances Farmer, save me a bunk in the mad house.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on March 31, 2022, 07:20:13 PM
I've read scores of books about Medieval history, maybe even hundreds of books, it is the one period in human history that interests me above all others, but the most detestable, the most biased, the most agenda-driven book on the subject I've ever been exposed to is one that came out late last year called The Bright Ages, by David M. Perry.

It was bad history, bad reading, bad scholarship, and bad use of paper, ink, bandwidth, and time. Not only that but the writer is p***y-whipped by the university industrial complex's feminist mafia like no author I've ever read.

I think this is the worst book I have ever hated this much and still finished out of dogged masochistic loathing, and if I died tomorrow I would skip past Purgatory and ascend straight to Heaven, as all my sins are surely atoned for through the suffering that entered my assaulted eyes.

If ever there is a Geneva Convention for readers' rights, this book will be classified alongside mustard gas.

I'm going to start sniffing modeling glue to destroy the brain cells that remember encountering this loathsome war crime of a book.

Frances Farmer, save me a bunk in the mad house.


Quit being so ambiguous and tell us what you really think!!!

My favorite books on the Middle Ages are A DISTANT MIRROR by Barbara Tuchman, and another one called RICHARD AND JOHN: KINGS AT WAR.  I don't remember the author and I'm too lazy to go look it up right now.
But either of those might purge this horror from your brain.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: ER on March 31, 2022, 07:26:42 PM
I've read scores of books about Medieval history, maybe even hundreds of books, it is the one period in human history that interests me above all others, but the most detestable, the most biased, the most agenda-driven book on the subject I've ever been exposed to is one that came out late last year called The Bright Ages, by David M. Perry.

It was bad history, bad reading, bad scholarship, and bad use of paper, ink, bandwidth, and time. Not only that but the writer is p***y-whipped by the university industrial complex's feminist mafia like no author I've ever read.

I think this is the worst book I have ever hated this much and still finished out of dogged masochistic loathing, and if I died tomorrow I would skip past Purgatory and ascend straight to Heaven, as all my sins are surely atoned for through the suffering that entered my assaulted eyes.

If ever there is a Geneva Convention for readers' rights, this book will be classified alongside mustard gas.

I'm going to start sniffing modeling glue to destroy the brain cells that remember encountering this loathsome war crime of a book.

Frances Farmer, save me a bunk in the mad house.


Quit being so ambiguous and tell us what you really think!!!

My favorite books on the Middle Ages are A DISTANT MIRROR by Barbara Tuchman, and another one called RICHARD AND JOHN: KINGS AT WAR.  I don't remember the author and I'm too lazy to go look it up right now.
But either of those might purge this horror from your brain.

I've read one of those; guess which?


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on March 31, 2022, 10:02:53 PM
I'll say A DISTANT MIRROR.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: ER on March 31, 2022, 10:39:43 PM
(https://pictures.abebooks.com/isbn/9780399504334-us.jpg)

I've read The Gashlycrumb Tinies to my son as a bedtime story. He loves it.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: ER on March 31, 2022, 10:40:09 PM
I'll say A DISTANT MIRROR.
And we have a winner!


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Alex on April 01, 2022, 02:02:22 AM
Mysteries of Candlekeep.

D-Day Through German Eyes: How the Wehrmacht Lost France.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: FatFreddysCat on April 01, 2022, 10:54:52 AM
The Devil's Music: How Christians Inspired, Condemned, and Embraced Rock N Roll by Randall J. Stephens


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on April 22, 2022, 09:48:10 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/518yASbWDXL._SX334_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

This will take a while.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: indianasmith on April 28, 2022, 10:06:52 PM
My April list has included:

1491 - NEW VISIONS OF THE AMERICAS BEFORE COLUMBUS, which was an interesting look at Native cultures in North and South America in the years before the contact era.  I do think that some of the author's conclusions were pretty subjective, and much information it still unknown, but nonetheless this was a fascinating read.
ABRAHAM LINCOLN AND THE FIGHT FOR PEACE was an in-depth look at how Lincoln planned to put the country back together after the Civil War, with an analysis of what went wrong after his death, and a look at how some of his ideas were employed in the occupation of Germany and Japan after WW2.  A very well-researched and interesting book that was a great aid as I prepare to write my new alternative history about Lincoln.
FIRST MAN IN ROME - A repeat read of one of my favorite works of historical fiction, tracing the unlikely rise of Gaius Marius, the only man elected as Consul of Rome seven times (during the Republic), and his defeat of the German invaders and the demagogue Saturninus.  I think McCullough, more than any author I have ever read, gives us a real picture of what Rome was like in the final century of the Republic.
ISAAC'S STORM is a stirring account of the Galveston hurricane of 1900, well-written, stirring, and tragic.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: lester1/2jr on May 12, 2022, 11:33:04 PM
Apostle - the author travels to all the sites of the alleged tombs of the apostles. https://www.amazon.com/Apostle-Travels-Among-Tombs-Twelve/dp/030727845X (https://www.amazon.com/Apostle-Travels-Among-Tombs-Twelve/dp/030727845X)


Some of these guys are easy to write about: Judas, Paul, John, etc others he has to dig a bit. Barnabus, for example, has 2 things known about him: one that he had the worst death of anyone: he was skinned alive, then also beheaded. There was a later "forbidden books" book where his physical description was described but it's probably not authentic. Basically the guy spends a lot of time in Greece and places like that talking to eastern Orthodox priests and/ or tour guides. A worthy project for sure!


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on May 13, 2022, 12:43:46 AM
yep i am  Cross Alex Cross #12 (2006) by James Patterson


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Jim H on May 22, 2022, 11:33:49 PM
I'm now listening to the second Jack Reacher book, Die Trying.  It seems like a pretty serious step down from the first one, which I read maybe 15 years ago.  Looking it up, many fans seem to consider the second the worst in the entire series.  Oh well, it's still passably entertaining. 


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: pennywise37 on May 23, 2022, 12:23:09 AM
i''m now reading  The Last Precinct (2000) Kay Scerpetta #11  By Patricia Cornwell  honestly it's a decent book thus far but it's  Not going to be among my favorites as i'm on Page #281  which is nearly halfway done with it.  but who knows maybe that will Change


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on June 03, 2022, 09:07:06 AM
Looking for some bathroom reading, picked up the "Encyclopedia of Psychotronic Film." It'll be interesting to see how many of the movies I've seen since I last read it decades ago.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Sitting Duck on June 04, 2022, 06:29:55 AM
If you're talking about The Psychotronic Encyclopedia of Film by Michael Weldon, it's notable for being virtually the only resource from before MST3K to have mostly accurate information on Manos: The Hands of Fate.


Title: Re: New! Reading Anything Thread 2.0
Post by: Rev. Powell on June 04, 2022, 08:30:52 AM
If you're talking about The Psychotronic Encyclopedia of Film by Michael Weldon, it's notable for being virtually the only resource from before MST3K to have mostly accurate information on Manos: The Hands of Fate.

The same. Before the internet you had to own multiple movie encyclopedias to read about movies you never thought you would ever get to see.