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Author Topic: Controversial TV series  (Read 6650 times)
Raffine
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« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2011, 10:20:32 PM »

*  Back in the late 1970s or early 80s, a TV series called PRISONER: CELL BLOCK H aired briefly on a local independent Boston TV station.  It was about a women's prison and was supposed to be "steamy."  I don't remember much about it other than it was not an American show and I didn't think it was as shocking as it was supposed to be.


Oh, I remember that one!

Somehow, this was included on one of the local station's weekday afternoon lineup, right in there with Bewitched and Leave It To Beaver. Needless to say, it was 'Must See TV' for the kiddies.

The series has a huge write up on the Wikipedia. Somebody out there is a fan.
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Jim H
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« Reply #16 on: February 01, 2011, 12:23:51 AM »

Quote
Second:  Is it still going on?  If not, it was self correcting, so it's over and there is not much point in complaining about the past.  As a very wise pig once stated, "you gotta put your past in your beind."  (Pumba, in THE LION KING).

In both Australia and the UK, it's rare but movies/video games can still be banned.  And that is something I find to be appalling, personally.  It's one way I think the US system is much better - government stays out of that game almost entirely.  Which is a good thing. 
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« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2011, 01:23:06 AM »

Quote
Second:  Is it still going on?  If not, it was self correcting, so it's over and there is not much point in complaining about the past.  As a very wise pig once stated, "you gotta put your past in your beind."  (Pumba, in THE LION KING).


In both Australia and the UK, it's rare but movies/video games can still be banned.  And that is something I find to be appalling, personally.  It's one way I think the US system is much better - government stays out of that game almost entirely.  Which is a good thing. 


www.fpb.gov.za  Bluesad Bluesad Bluesad
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vukxfiles
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« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2011, 04:11:29 AM »

OK, so if you think that violence and sex doesn't sell well, then explian to me how a show like CSI: Las Vegas, which is broadcast on network tv and contains plenty of violence, gore and sex, can now be in its 11th season? Don't you tell me that CSI isn't selling well, because it is one of the most popular crime shows.
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ulthar
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« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2011, 10:06:11 AM »


OK, so if you think that violence and sex doesn't sell well, then explian to me how a show like CSI: Las Vegas, which is broadcast on network tv and contains plenty of violence, gore and sex, can now be in its 11th season? Don't you tell me that CSI isn't selling well, because it is one of the most popular crime shows.


No, I know sex and violence sell extremely well...but you are saying it is not 'extreme' enough for YOU.  I'm saying that CSI is at that right point that people care to watch, are JUST titillated enough and not offended.

The people that run these businesses are very experienced and do a TON of work (most of the time...*cough* "Firefly" *cough*) to make sure they are making money.  It's a business, and they are generally not in the business of offending people.  They find that happy point that pushes the envelope a little, but not too far.  Sometimes, the gov't steps in, but for the most part, people don't want TV to be too extreme.  They satisfy that 'desire' in other ways.

You have said several times in these two threads that you are looking for things "offensive as possible."  You are not going to find that, in general, on American broadcast television. 

All I am saying is that if you want offensive visual media, look elsewhere.  I'll say again that just because YOU want "extreme" stuff on TV, that does not mean others (read...enough people to create a market) want it, too.  And since you can find what you want elsewhere, why say "Okay, TV should be what I want, also."

In short, the people that DON'T want "extreme" stuff get to have a choice, too.  They can watch "7th Heaven" (which consistently beat "Buffy" in the ratings, by the way) or "Everybody Loves Raymond" or even "CSI." Anything stronger, you have cable, DVD, the Internet and the theater itself...or underground markets for really oddball stuff.  It's out there.

You don't need to take away only medium that is fairly "vanilla" from those that want that to get what you want.  If "Southpark" were to start to be shown on broadcast television, those that don't watch "Southpark" now will quit watching; you take away a huge market segment THAT SPENDS MONEY on the products advertisers are selling.

Again, if the market as a whole WANTED what you suggest is "missing," it would be there.  The regulations would change and the programming would change.  "Southpark" would be primetime on ABC.

I guess I'm done with this, now.  We are going in circles.  You are saying "offensive" or "controversial" stuff should be more prevalent, and I'm saying that not enough people want that stuff...en masse...to put it there.
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« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2011, 12:20:21 PM »

*  Back in the late 1970s or early 80s, a TV series called PRISONER: CELL BLOCK H aired briefly on a local independent Boston TV station.  It was about a women's prison and was supposed to be "steamy."  I don't remember much about it other than it was not an American show and I didn't think it was as shocking as it was supposed to be.

*  Also in the late 70s there was a show called ALL THAT GLITTERS.  It was something about women who were high-powered corporate executives.  I think it had some sexuality to it, sort of a 70s version of SEX IN THE CITY oe something.

I'm your man for Prisoner Cell Block H I watched it all the time when it was on Channel 11 (WPIX New York) in the late 1970's.   I remember a lot of it and while it wasn't steamy, it was fairly violent-a few beatings, some stabbings, and some drug use.  It was fairly nasty.

Then, in terms of jail shows,  Oz came along in the mid 90's, blew every other prison show out of the water,  and re-defined the words "controversial" and "violent" to new heights like we'd never seen . I'd never seen anything like it before or since.
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The Burgomaster
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« Reply #21 on: February 01, 2011, 12:21:59 PM »

*  Back in the late 1970s or early 80s, a TV series called PRISONER: CELL BLOCK H aired briefly on a local independent Boston TV station.  It was about a women's prison and was supposed to be "steamy."  I don't remember much about it other than it was not an American show and I didn't think it was as shocking as it was supposed to be.


Oh, I remember that one!

Somehow, this was included on one of the local station's weekday afternoon lineup, right in there with Bewitched and Leave It To Beaver. Needless to say, it was 'Must See TV' for the kiddies.

The series has a huge write up on the Wikipedia. Somebody out there is a fan.



In my area it was on at like 10:00 or 11:00 Friday or Saturday night.  I don't think the TV station carried it for more than 6 months or so.  I seem to remember it came and went pretty quickly.  

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Jack
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« Reply #22 on: February 01, 2011, 01:21:42 PM »

I remember Prisoner Cell Block H.  It seemed like it was just women standing around talking;  or at least 99% of it was.  No incidental music whatsoever, which just screamed low budget.
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Couchtr26
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« Reply #23 on: February 01, 2011, 06:35:12 PM »


and if it is right/wrong that the government controls what we see.


The government does NOT control what you/we see...only what is shown on broadcast tv with the most basic equipment.

You can watch hard core xxx porn all you want, or graphic violence or aryan nation programming if that floats your boat, or just about anything else.  There are cable shows and DVD rentals, the Internet and heck, make your own trash if you want to.  The government has actually very little to say about most of what is available.

What is wrong in your mind with a community (or nation) of people agreeing to a baseline standard regarding what t is available to everybody?  It's not "censorship."  It's decency...respect of others.  I think the buzz word in use today is "tolerance."  Why should I be asked to accept offensive programming on TV that I don't want my children to see (or really don't want to see myself) in the name of tolerance, but my viewpoint is for some reason consider intolerant? 

We've had this and similar discussions on this web site many times in the past 8 or so years...and my position remains the same.  If a community decides it does NOT wish certain subjects of media to be publicly and freely available...that is the standard that is used for that community. 

The bottom line is that in this country (and I am only speaking for this county, the US), the community at large has decided, and continues to believe, that the baseline standard for broadcast television is different from other forms of media that can more easily be controlled or blocked or ignored in any given home.  The stuff that is out there for EVERYONE meets something of a test that a great majority would approve.

Censorship is the government telling me that I can have NONE of it in MY home for ANY reason, and that they are willing to come into my home to check me out for the purpose.  This is, in general, not happening.  With the exception of child pornography (and maybe a few other really specific niches), you can own the raunchiest trash you want...and so long as YOU control who watches it (ie, not broadcasting it out of your home), NO ONE CARES.

Is our system perfect as it's put into practice?  No; of course not.  But to claim that having a baseline standard that meets the approval of a huge majority is censorship is incorrect.

Very well said.  We are free to entertain ourselves however we so desire.  It is only in certain areas that it is controlled due to mass availability.  Even that is questionable as things become somewhat laxer at certain times of the day in the US. 

However, in case of point on controversy on TV, I don't recall episodes so much but remember living in Lawton, OK when Spielberg wanted to show Schindler's List uncut and there was a big complaint about it amongst the city council.  I believe they asked the local stations to show an alternate program.  I find this odd as much of the complaint is taken out of context.  There comes a time when context is very important to what you are trying to say. 
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Umaril The Unfeathered
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« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2011, 09:51:00 PM »


and if it is right/wrong that the government controls what we see.


The government does NOT control what you/we see...only what is shown on broadcast tv with the most basic equipment.

You can watch hard core xxx porn all you want, or graphic violence or aryan nation programming if that floats your boat, or just about anything else.  There are cable shows and DVD rentals, the Internet and heck, make your own trash if you want to.  The government has actually very little to say about most of what is available.

What is wrong in your mind with a community (or nation) of people agreeing to a baseline standard regarding what t is available to everybody?  It's not "censorship."  It's decency...respect of others.  I think the buzz word in use today is "tolerance."  Why should I be asked to accept offensive programming on TV that I don't want my children to see (or really don't want to see myself) in the name of tolerance, but my viewpoint is for some reason consider intolerant? 

We've had this and similar discussions on this web site many times in the past 8 or so years...and my position remains the same.  If a community decides it does NOT wish certain subjects of media to be publicly and freely available...that is the standard that is used for that community. 

The bottom line is that in this country (and I am only speaking for this county, the US), the community at large has decided, and continues to believe, that the baseline standard for broadcast television is different from other forms of media that can more easily be controlled or blocked or ignored in any given home.  The stuff that is out there for EVERYONE meets something of a test that a great majority would approve.

Censorship is the government telling me that I can have NONE of it in MY home for ANY reason, and that they are willing to come into my home to check me out for the purpose.  This is, in general, not happening.  With the exception of child pornography (and maybe a few other really specific niches), you can own the raunchiest trash you want...and so long as YOU control who watches it (ie, not broadcasting it out of your home), NO ONE CARES.

Is our system perfect as it's put into practice?  No; of course not.  But to claim that having a baseline standard that meets the approval of a huge majority is censorship is incorrect.

Very well said.  We are free to entertain ourselves however we so desire.  It is only in certain areas that it is controlled due to mass availability.  Even that is questionable as things become somewhat laxer at certain times of the day in the US. 

However, in case of point on controversy on TV, I don't recall episodes so much but remember living in Lawton, OK when Spielberg wanted to show Schindler's List uncut and there was a big complaint about it amongst the city council.  I believe they asked the local stations to show an alternate program.  I find this odd as much of the complaint is taken out of context.  There comes a time when context is very important to what you are trying to say. 

With regard to Schindler's List I think there was alot going on behind the decision to request alternate programming.

The Holocaust is still a hot button issue and offensive to some groups who deny it's occurrence, for whatever their reason may be (anti-Semitism, Muslims, historical skepticism, ect.)

And then you have the possibility of kids seeing it, and the possible backlash from some parent who wants to blame the station for their kid's traumatization even though THEY were the ones that let the kid see it in the first place.

America has always had to please the easily offended in one way or another.

Either way, a film of that magnitude dosen't simply get replaced with alternate programming for no reason, it's a very weighty and graphic film.

Although,  I myself wish that things of this nature would be presented uncut to drive home the point that some of these things DID happen, and that the onscreen horrors pale in comparison to the TRUE horrors that occurred.  We have to stop being so "stick up the ass" about history.
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vukxfiles
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« Reply #25 on: February 09, 2011, 12:36:42 AM »

You are right abouy parents' responsibility. If a child id traumatised then the parents are to blame. They can also be traumatised by DVDs or the internet, and still those things have what I'm talking about.
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Killer Bees
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« Reply #26 on: February 09, 2011, 04:33:57 AM »

Lets make a list or talk about controversial shows and episodes. Personally, I like shows that have the balls to show what they want without being afraid of the FCC taking them down. I hate censorship and cannot enjoy shows that I see are censored because it limits the overall show and I cannot expect a lot of things from it.

Apart from the premium cable channels, like HBO and Showtime, which are allowed to show obcscene and controvesial content, there are loads of network shows that have the balls to also show what they want. Exaples include South Park, Family Guy, CSI, The X-Files (for its time).

Two X-Files episodes have recieved a TV-MA rating. The first was The Calusari from season 2, which features a baby being killed. The second was Home from season 4, featuring a redneck family that practices incest, and in the beginning of the episode they bury a newly born baby alive becuase it is too mutated to be able to live. Actually, Home is often cut out of re-runs of the show, so the easier way to see it is on DVD.

Also we should talk about whether you think it is good or bad that these shows exist, and if it is right/wrong that the government controls what we see.

I believe it's right that these shows are allowed to air.  Movies, books and music have always been the ways society has faced and dealt with subjects considered "taboo" by polite society.  Without these outlets, the world would be way worse than it is.  And I for one am glad they exist.  Controverisal topics should always be discussed regardless of your personal viewpoint. 
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« Reply #27 on: February 09, 2011, 10:54:07 PM »

It seems like in the 70's TV was less politically correct. Shows like "All in the Family," The Jefferson's," and "Sanford and Son" discussed race issues in a funny way and the main characters were even bigots. JJ even caught VD on "Good Times. On "WKRP" Dr. Johnny Fever was always putting eye drops in to cover up the fact that he was a pot head. In the Reagan years TV got real uptight. "Married with Children" was so controversial because of the graphic sexual language. It was such a breath of fresh air and the show never got the praise it really deserved when it was on. "Night Court" was pretty racy but always got away with it because they would ram a morality message down your throat in the last 10 minutes of the show. Once "South Park" came along and broke almost every taboo, it seems like you can say or do anything on TV now. Sex and race are always hot topics, but nobody talks much about violence. As an adult horror fan I enjoy it in movies and TV but I'm not sure if I had kids, I'd let them watch some of this stuff. When I was a kid the worst you could imagine was Jason putting an axe through your head, now we have films where you see people almost decapitated and skinned alive. I have never been for censorship, but we do live in a violent society and I think parent's should care about what they're kids watch. That being said, I don't think they should over react and form protest groups. Parent your own children in your own house, as long as you do parent.
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Killer Bees
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« Reply #28 on: February 13, 2011, 03:49:19 AM »

*  Back in the late 1970s or early 80s, a TV series called PRISONER: CELL BLOCK H aired briefly on a local independent Boston TV station.  It was about a women's prison and was supposed to be "steamy."  I don't remember much about it other than it was not an American show and I didn't think it was as shocking as it was supposed to be.

*  Also in the late 70s there was a show called ALL THAT GLITTERS.  It was something about women who were high-powered corporate executives.  I think it had some sexuality to it, sort of a 70s version of SEX IN THE CITY oe something.

Prisoner Cell Block H was an Aussie show just called Prisoner here.  It had nearly every family glued to the telly whenever it was on.  It was very controversial for it's time because it supposedly showed what really happens in women's prisons.  The language was shocking for its time (the prisoners called one of the guards "Vinegar Tits" lol).

There was obvious lesbianism and every man who showed up was considered the enemy and portrayhed as either weak and ineffectual or a rapist.

Telly in this country has always been progressive with language and nudity and content.  For instance, it's permissable to say the word "fsck" after 8.30 pm and has been for a really long time.  We are always surprised by how skittish American tv networks are about such things.
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Flower, gleam and glow
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vukxfiles
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« Reply #29 on: February 18, 2011, 05:59:49 AM »

I found this site: http://www.parentstv.org/ptc/publications/reports/top10bestandworst/2006/main.asp

It lists, for a decade of seasons, the best and worst shows for family viewing. Now I finally know what shows these stupid groups hate so I know what to watch. They are trying to warn people of explicit shows, but instead unintentionally give me ideas of what to watch.
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